California

The Latest: Figures show drop in crime reporting by Latinos

  • FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2017 file photo, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck speaks at a news conference in Los Angeles, Beck said Tuesday, March 21, 2017, that reports of sexual assault and domestic violence by Latino residents have dropped amid concerns that those in the country illegally could face deportation if they interact with police. He said that sexual assault reports have dropped 25 percent and domestic violence reports have fallen 10 percent among the city's Latino population since the beginning of the year.  (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2017 file photo, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck speaks at a news conference in Los Angeles, Beck said Tuesday, March 21, 2017, that reports of sexual assault and domestic violence by Latino residents have dropped amid concerns that those in the country illegally could face deportation if they interact with police. He said that sexual assault reports have dropped 25 percent and domestic violence reports have fallen 10 percent among the city's Latino population since the beginning of the year. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2014 file photo, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck speaks at a news conference at LAPD headquarters. Los Angeles' police chief says reports of sexual assault and domestic violence by Latino residents have dropped amid concerns that those in the country illegally could face deportation if they interact with police. Beck said Tuesday, March 21, 2017, that sexual assault reports have dropped 25 percent and domestic violence reports have fallen 10 percent among the city's Latino population since the beginning of the year. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

    FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2014 file photo, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck speaks at a news conference at LAPD headquarters. Los Angeles' police chief says reports of sexual assault and domestic violence by Latino residents have dropped amid concerns that those in the country illegally could face deportation if they interact with police. Beck said Tuesday, March 21, 2017, that sexual assault reports have dropped 25 percent and domestic violence reports have fallen 10 percent among the city's Latino population since the beginning of the year. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on reports of sexual assaults and domestic violence declining among Latinos in Los Angeles amid concerns of increased immigration enforcement. (all times local):

11:10 a.m.

Crime statistics show there were 41 fewer sexual assaults reported by Latinos in Los Angeles during the first two months of 2017 compared to the same period last year.

The statistics provided by the Los Angeles Police Department also show there were 118 less reports of domestic violence reported by Latinos.

The same large declines haven't been seen in other ethnic groups.

Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said there is a strong correlation between the drop in police reports and concerns of increased immigration enforcement that the Trump administration has called for.

Beck says immigrants in the country illegally fear they could face deportation if they interact with police or appear in court.

Jessica Vaughan, with the Center for Immigration Studies, says it is careless to draw a conclusion between the drop in reporting and fears of immigration enforcement.