RELIGION

Teaching Trump: Should teachers offer up their own politics?

  • In this March 8, 2017 photo, teacher Julie Conti, right, leads her government class at Niagara Falls High School through a lesson about political cartoons, examining the structure and intent of the cartoons but staying neutral on whether she agrees with the content, in Niagara Falls, N.Y. With current events increasingly dominating classroom discussions, there's a debate among educators whether it's appropriate for teachers to weigh in with their own political views. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)

    In this March 8, 2017 photo, teacher Julie Conti, right, leads her government class at Niagara Falls High School through a lesson about political cartoons, examining the structure and intent of the cartoons but staying neutral on whether she agrees with the content, in Niagara Falls, N.Y. With current events increasingly dominating classroom discussions, there's a debate among educators whether it's appropriate for teachers to weigh in with their own political views. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this March 8, 2017 photo, campaign posters representing a variety of candidates are displayed in a classroom at Niagara Falls High School in Niagara Falls, N.Y. With current events increasingly dominating classroom discussions, there's a debate among educators whether it's appropriate for teachers to weigh in with their own political views. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)

    In this March 8, 2017 photo, campaign posters representing a variety of candidates are displayed in a classroom at Niagara Falls High School in Niagara Falls, N.Y. With current events increasingly dominating classroom discussions, there's a debate among educators whether it's appropriate for teachers to weigh in with their own political views. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)  (The Associated Press)

Teaching current events in the age of Donald Trump has become fraught with peril for some educators who have interjected their personal political beliefs into the classroom.

A New York City teacher was warned over a homework question critical of Trump. An Alabama district fielded complaints for a teacher's "Obama, you're fired!" caption under a Trump display. And video caught a Texas art teacher shooting a squirt gun at an image of Trump, and yelling, "die!"

Is it ever OK for teachers to offer up their viewpoints?

It's become a debate among educators at a time when students have become energized by classroom discussions of such hot-button issues as immigration and racial justice.

Education experts say teachers should be careful not to shape their students' beliefs for them.