Illegal Immigrants

Fearful immigrants are offered anti-deportation training

  • In this March 7, 2017 photo, Pascalina Chirinos poses for a portrait in the Queens borough of New York where she was attending a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York. Chirinos, a permanent resident from Venezuela who has been in the U.S. for about five years said she attended so she could share the information with friends and neighbors, but also to know her own rights if she were ever caught up in immigration enforcement efforts. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    In this March 7, 2017 photo, Pascalina Chirinos poses for a portrait in the Queens borough of New York where she was attending a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York. Chirinos, a permanent resident from Venezuela who has been in the U.S. for about five years said she attended so she could share the information with friends and neighbors, but also to know her own rights if she were ever caught up in immigration enforcement efforts. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this March 7, 2017 photo, immigrants attend a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York, in the Queens borough of New York. Advocacy organizations in New York City and around the country are holding training sessions that offer tactical tips to immigrants worried about being deported. The advice includes keeping the door closed if immigration enforcement officers knock and not volunteering any information other than your name. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    In this March 7, 2017 photo, immigrants attend a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York, in the Queens borough of New York. Advocacy organizations in New York City and around the country are holding training sessions that offer tactical tips to immigrants worried about being deported. The advice includes keeping the door closed if immigration enforcement officers knock and not volunteering any information other than your name. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this March 7, 2017 photo, a volunteer takes part in role play during a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York, in the Queens borough of New York. Advice that's being drummed into immigrants around the country, at trainings includes not opening the door if ICE knocks, not even a little bit. If you're taken into custody, tell them your name and nothing else and don't sign anything.  (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    In this March 7, 2017 photo, a volunteer takes part in role play during a know-your-rights training session by the pro-immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York, in the Queens borough of New York. Advice that's being drummed into immigrants around the country, at trainings includes not opening the door if ICE knocks, not even a little bit. If you're taken into custody, tell them your name and nothing else and don't sign anything. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)  (The Associated Press)

Don't open the front door if immigration officials knock, not even a little bit. If you're taken into custody, tell them your name and nothing else. Definitely don't sign anything.

That's the advice being drummed into immigrants in New York City and around the country at training sessions put on by advocacy organizations.

Called "know your rights" training, the sessions have been pushed by some groups as a way to prepare for a possible crackdown on illegal immigration under President Donald Trump.

Organizers say the idea is to give immigrants guidance on how to legitimately push back against attempts to detain them.

Most of the tactics revolve around keeping agents from learning anything they don't already know.