RELIGION

Church massacre, other killings strain forgiveness for many

  • FILE - In this June 18, 2015 file photo, Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, N.C. When nine black churchgoers in Charleston were massacred by Roof, a white man with Confederate sympathies, the city stayed calm and the victims' families offered examples of grace and forgiveness. Now that church shooting suspect Roof has been convicted in a federal death penalty trial, some say the parade of killings of black people feels at odds with the call to forgive. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)

    FILE - In this June 18, 2015 file photo, Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, N.C. When nine black churchgoers in Charleston were massacred by Roof, a white man with Confederate sympathies, the city stayed calm and the victims' families offered examples of grace and forgiveness. Now that church shooting suspect Roof has been convicted in a federal death penalty trial, some say the parade of killings of black people feels at odds with the call to forgive. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2016, file photo, Michael Slager, right, walks from the Charleston County Courthouse under the protection from the Charleston County Sheriff's Department after a mistrial was declared for his trial in Charleston, S.C. When nine black churchgoers in Charleston were massacred by Dylann Roof, a white man with Confederate sympathies, the city stayed calm and the victims’ families offered examples of grace and forgiveness. Roof’s guilty verdict came less than two weeks after a jury deadlocked in the case of Slager, a white ex-police officer charged with fatally shooting Walter Scott, a black man, as Scott tried to flee an April 2015 traffic stop. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2016, file photo, Michael Slager, right, walks from the Charleston County Courthouse under the protection from the Charleston County Sheriff's Department after a mistrial was declared for his trial in Charleston, S.C. When nine black churchgoers in Charleston were massacred by Dylann Roof, a white man with Confederate sympathies, the city stayed calm and the victims’ families offered examples of grace and forgiveness. Roof’s guilty verdict came less than two weeks after a jury deadlocked in the case of Slager, a white ex-police officer charged with fatally shooting Walter Scott, a black man, as Scott tried to flee an April 2015 traffic stop. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Felicia Sanders, who watched her son Tywanza Sanders die at the hands of Dylann Roof, smiles while speaking to media after Roof was found guilty of murdering nine parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston in a hate crime Friday, Dec. 15, 2016, in Charleston S.C. "I wear a smile now because the nine victims wore beautiful smiles in photos before they were killed," Sanders said. (Matt Walsh/The State via AP)

    Felicia Sanders, who watched her son Tywanza Sanders die at the hands of Dylann Roof, smiles while speaking to media after Roof was found guilty of murdering nine parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston in a hate crime Friday, Dec. 15, 2016, in Charleston S.C. "I wear a smile now because the nine victims wore beautiful smiles in photos before they were killed," Sanders said. (Matt Walsh/The State via AP)  (The Associated Press)

When nine black churchgoers in Charleston were massacred by a white man with Confederate sympathies last year, the city stayed calm and the victims' families offered examples of grace and forgiveness.

Now that church shooting suspect Dylann Roof has been convicted in a federal death penalty trial, some say the parade of killings of black people feels at odds with the call to forgive.

Roof's guilty verdict came less than two weeks after a jury deadlocked in the case of a white ex-police officer charged with fatally shooting Walter Scott in the back as he fled during an April 2015 traffic stop. Such cases are stoking a longing for justice among black Americans looking to hold someone accountable. Prosecutions and convictions of officers in such cases have been rare.