DISASTERS

New Jersey coast to get disputed, long-delayed sand dunes

  • This March 5, 2013 photo shows a house in Long Beach Township that was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy. A project to build dunes in the area hardest-hit by Sandy will get under way in the spring, even though some property owners continue to fight it in court. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    This March 5, 2013 photo shows a house in Long Beach Township that was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy. A project to build dunes in the area hardest-hit by Sandy will get under way in the spring, even though some property owners continue to fight it in court. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)  (The Associated Press)

  • This March 5, 2013 photo shows protective sand dunes between the ocean and homes in Harvey Cedars, NJ. five months after Superstorm Sandy struck the New Jersey coast. A project to build dunes in the area hardest-hit by Sandy will get under way in the spring, even though some property owners continue to fight it in court. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    This March 5, 2013 photo shows protective sand dunes between the ocean and homes in Harvey Cedars, NJ. five months after Superstorm Sandy struck the New Jersey coast. A project to build dunes in the area hardest-hit by Sandy will get under way in the spring, even though some property owners continue to fight it in court. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)  (The Associated Press)

  • This Sept. 29, 2016 photo shows New Jersey Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin, left; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lt. Col. Michael Bliss, center; and Paul Jeffrey, president of the Ortley Beach Voters and Taxpayers Association, right, hold a news conference in Toms River, N.J. to announce that bids have been solicited for a massive sand dune project to protect the part of the New Jersey shoreline that was hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The work is due to begin in the spring.  (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    This Sept. 29, 2016 photo shows New Jersey Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin, left; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lt. Col. Michael Bliss, center; and Paul Jeffrey, president of the Ortley Beach Voters and Taxpayers Association, right, hold a news conference in Toms River, N.J. to announce that bids have been solicited for a massive sand dune project to protect the part of the New Jersey shoreline that was hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The work is due to begin in the spring. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)  (The Associated Press)

Almost four years after Superstorm Sandy pummeled his neighborhood so badly that Britain's Prince Harry had to stop by for a look at the damage, Paul Jeffrey is ready to sleep soundly again.

His Ortley Beach community in Toms River, New Jersey, called itself ground zero of the 2012 storm that washed entire neighborhoods off the map and in some cases, into the bay.

It is among shore towns in a 14-mile stretch of coast that will soon be getting protective sand dunes as part of a $150 million project that has been repeatedly delayed by litigation from some property owners.

New Jersey officials solicited bids this week for the project, which should begin in the spring.

But opponents vow to keep fighting it in court.