Massachusetts

Brazilians in US share mix of pride, skepticism of Rio games

In this Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016 photo Camila Ornelas, left, and Vander Junior, right, both originally of Brazil, watch a televised soccer match between Brazil and Denmark at the Rio Olympics while sitting at the bar in the Tropical Cafe, in Framingham, Mass. There is pride of the Rio Olympics in this Boston bedroom community, nicknamed "Little Brazil" for its thriving population of Brazilian immigrants and their shops and bakeries. But there is also skepticism in Framingham, and in other major Brazilian enclaves around the U.S., among those who fled poverty and corruption. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

In this Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016 photo Camila Ornelas, left, and Vander Junior, right, both originally of Brazil, watch a televised soccer match between Brazil and Denmark at the Rio Olympics while sitting at the bar in the Tropical Cafe, in Framingham, Mass. There is pride of the Rio Olympics in this Boston bedroom community, nicknamed "Little Brazil" for its thriving population of Brazilian immigrants and their shops and bakeries. But there is also skepticism in Framingham, and in other major Brazilian enclaves around the U.S., among those who fled poverty and corruption. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)  (The Associated Press)

Pride in the Rio Olympics is palpable in Framingham, Massachusetts, nicknamed "Little Brazil" for its thriving population of Brazilian immigrants.

But here and in other major Brazilian-American enclaves, many expats also are striking a cautionary tone, reflecting concern that the celebration of the games may only serve to mask Brazil's deeper political, economic and environmental problems.

At Rosa's Beauty Salon near the heart of downtown Framingham, owner Rosa Barrosa says Rio de Janeiro is the perfect place to host the Olympics and that the world will be surprised by its success.

At the nearby Brazilian-American Center, staffer Thulio Felisberto, a college student, says while there is a sense of pride among many in the community, some also fear the Olympics are only covering up the recent political and economic crises.