Vermont

'Rainbows' on Vermont mountain bring message of light, love

  • In this June 28, 2016 photo, a member of the Rainbow Family of Living Light, who goes by the name of Joe, splits wood at his campsite in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    In this June 28, 2016 photo, a member of the Rainbow Family of Living Light, who goes by the name of Joe, splits wood at his campsite in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this June 28, 2016 photo, a sign welcomes people to the gathering of the Rainbow Family of Living Light in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    In this June 28, 2016 photo, a sign welcomes people to the gathering of the Rainbow Family of Living Light in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this June 28, 2016 photo, members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light gather under a tarp at their campsite in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    In this June 28, 2016 photo, members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light gather under a tarp at their campsite in Mount Tabor, Vt. People from across the country are flocking to the Green Mountain National Forest for the annual Rainbow Gathering of Living Light. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)  (The Associated Press)

People are crossing the country to attend this year's Rainbow Family of Living Light and connect with others they feel share their goal of peace, love and illumination.

But hosting up to 10,000 people in primitive campsites on a Vermont mountainside strains the resources of the U.S. Forest Service and some locals see the event as an intrusive gathering of aging hippies.

The decades-old annual gathering of "Rainbows," as they call themselves, is expected to peak July 4.

Rainbow Jai Love, of Eugene, Oregon, says many people who thought they were lost, find friendship and family.

Mount Tabor store owner Cindy Kapusta says she's just trying to be prepared for the thousands of people descending on her town.