The Latest on the Senate votes on gun control legislation (all times Eastern):

3:45 p.m.

Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte says she will support a Democratic amendment to allow the government to ban the sale of guns to suspected terrorists, a reversal after voting against a similar version in December.

Ayotte, who is in a tough re-election race in New Hampshire, says she will vote for the amendment sponsored by Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California. She'll also back a Republican alternative to delay gun sales to suspected terrorist for 72 hours, but require court action to block the sale permanently.

Ayotte says she is working with Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine on a compromise. That version would prohibit the sale of guns to terrorism suspects who are on the government's no-fly list and allow an appeals process for those who may be mistakenly on the list.

New Hampshire is home to some of the nation's most lenient gun laws, but Ayotte's approval rating fell after she voted against expanding background checks following the shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.

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2:30 p.m.

A top Republican is rejecting a potential compromise on gun control negotiated by moderate Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine.

Texas Sen. John Cornyn, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, said Monday that Collins' proposal is problematic because it would immediately prohibit the sale of guns to people on the government's no fly list — even those mistakenly identified as terrorism suspects. Cornyn says the appeals process in the bill comes too late.

The Senate is voting Monday on an amendment from Cornyn to allow the government to delay a gun sale to a suspected terrorist for 72 hours, but require court action to block the sale permanently. It's unclear if Collins' legislation will get a vote.

Cornyn said that "any time you are denying an American citizen their constitutional rights it ought to be with evidence." He says the "burden ought to be on the government and it ought to come from a court."

A spokeswoman for Collins says the bill has "thorough and robust" protections for those who may mistakenly be on the list.