CRIME

Baltimore police leader acknowledges flaws exposed by trial

  • A mural is seen at the site of Freddie Gray's arrest in the Sandtown neighborhood of Baltimore, Monday, May 23, 2016, after Officer Edward Nero, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Gray, was acquitted of all charges in his trial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    A mural is seen at the site of Freddie Gray's arrest in the Sandtown neighborhood of Baltimore, Monday, May 23, 2016, after Officer Edward Nero, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Gray, was acquitted of all charges in his trial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this March 3, 2016 file photo, Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, left, arrives at Maryland Court of Appeals in Annapolis, Md. The Baltimore's top prosecutor is facing criticism that she moved too quickly to file charges against six officers in the death of Freddie Gray without first ensuring there was enough evidence to bring them to bear. A judge on Monday, May 23, acquitted Officer Edward Nero of the assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges in the April 2015 arrest of the African-American man. Legal experts say the acquittal in the racially charged case could be seen by some as a confirmation of criticism that Mosby rushed to file charges. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

    FILE - In this March 3, 2016 file photo, Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, left, arrives at Maryland Court of Appeals in Annapolis, Md. The Baltimore's top prosecutor is facing criticism that she moved too quickly to file charges against six officers in the death of Freddie Gray without first ensuring there was enough evidence to bring them to bear. A judge on Monday, May 23, acquitted Officer Edward Nero of the assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges in the April 2015 arrest of the African-American man. Legal experts say the acquittal in the racially charged case could be seen by some as a confirmation of criticism that Mosby rushed to file charges. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • John Nero, center left, and Edward Nero, center right, brother and father of Officer Edward Nero, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, are escorted out of a courthouse after Nero was acquitted of all charges in his trial in Baltimore, Monday, May 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    John Nero, center left, and Edward Nero, center right, brother and father of Officer Edward Nero, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, are escorted out of a courthouse after Nero was acquitted of all charges in his trial in Baltimore, Monday, May 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)  (The Associated Press)

The trial of an officer cleared in the death of a young black man severely injured in police custody has revealed deep and systemic problems within the Baltimore Police Department.

Testimony showed that officers are inadequately trained and routinely ignore rules and regulations designed to keep people safe.

The police commissioner acknowledged the failings Tuesday and announced a new program to help make sure officers read and understand general orders and policies.

The announcement came less than 24 hours after a judge acquitted Officer Edward Nero of assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct charges in the arrest of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old man who died a week after being critically injured in a police van.