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AP Exclusive: Color index for US border security is rejected

  • In this Thursday, March 17, 2016, photo, Robert Leviton poses for a photo on the balcony of his townhouse in Pasadena, Calif. The traffic on the stretch of highway, background, that runs alongside his complex creates a persistent din and is visible from any of his townhome's north-facing windows. Leviton knew it would be like this when he bought the two-bedroom unit for $666,000 last summer. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

    In this Thursday, March 17, 2016, photo, Robert Leviton poses for a photo on the balcony of his townhouse in Pasadena, Calif. The traffic on the stretch of highway, background, that runs alongside his complex creates a persistent din and is visible from any of his townhome's north-facing windows. Leviton knew it would be like this when he bought the two-bedroom unit for $666,000 last summer. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol agent drives near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Sunland Park, N.M. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has rejected a new proposal of color-coded alerts to measure border security after a consultant called the system simplistic and misleading. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol agent drives near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Sunland Park, N.M. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has rejected a new proposal of color-coded alerts to measure border security after a consultant called the system simplistic and misleading. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol agent drives near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Sunland Park, N.M. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has rejected a new proposal of color-coded alerts to measure border security after a consultant called the system simplistic and misleading. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol agent drives near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Sunland Park, N.M. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has rejected a new proposal of color-coded alerts to measure border security after a consultant called the system simplistic and misleading. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)  (The Associated Press)

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has rejected a color-coded scheme to measure border security after hiring a consultant that dismissed the idea as simplistic and misleading.

The proposed index came after a color-coded system to measure terror threats was dropped in 2011 amid widespread confusion and ridicule.

Agency staff proposed the system of reds, yellows and greens in 2014. The Institute for Defense Analyses says in a 53-page report obtained by The Associated Press that Homeland Security should avoid repeating mistakes.

The proposal was never made public, nor was the consultant's report. Asked about its status, agency spokeswoman Gillian Christensen says there are no plans for a color index to measure border security.