A look at what people are saying about race and poverty as they relate to the Flint water crisis:

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"We've had a city in the United States of America where the population, which is poor in many ways and majority African-American, has been drinking and bathing in lead-contaminated water. And the governor of that state acted as though he didn't really care. He had requests for help that he basically stone-walled. I'll tell you what: If the kids in a rich suburb of Detroit had been drinking contaminated water and being bathed in it, there would've been action." — Hillary Clinton, Democratic candidate for president.

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"Much of Gov. Snyder's time in office has been focused on improving the quality of life for people living in our urban areas, especially Detroit. Bringing Detroit back to a solid fiscal foundation has allowed the city to restore services, and we've watched its economy grow, creating jobs and better opportunities. The governor also has focused on improving education in all our cities, knowing that students need to not just graduate, but graduate with in-demand skills as they compete in a global economy." — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder's staff in a statement defending his record.

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"It's a minority community. It's a poor community, and our voices were not heard. And that's part of the problem." — Flint Mayor Karen Weaver.

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"Let's call this what it is. It's not just a water crisis. It's a racial crisis. It's a poverty crisis. That's what this is, and that's what created this." — filmmaker and Flint native Michael Moore.

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"Flint was once a great city, the birthplace of General Motors, and it's fallen on hard times now because of General Motors reassigning their plants to other places. The aftermath has left a lot of people destitute and desperate, and they feel like their voices aren't being heard, and it just adds to the frustration." — Phil Rashead, 66-year-old Flint resident.