DISASTERS

Now that sink hole is fixed, wrecked cars are revving up visits to National Corvette Museum

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Terry Jorgensen of Deland, Fla., takes a photo of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

    In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Terry Jorgensen of Deland, Fla., takes a photo of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Stacy Jorgensen of Los Angeles, examines a display of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The car-swallowing hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

    In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Stacy Jorgensen of Los Angeles, examines a display of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The car-swallowing hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Wanda Cohen, of Roswell, Ga., takes a photo of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The car-swallowing hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

    In this Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, photo, Wanda Cohen, of Roswell, Ga., takes a photo of the cars that were swallowed by the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The car-swallowing hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the museum. Yellow tape now marks the boundaries of the cavity that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)  (The Associated Press)

The car-swallowing hole has been fixed but not forgotten at the National Corvette Museum in Kentucky.

Instead of a gaping sinkhole driving tourism, now it's the vintage sports cars crunched by rocks and dirt.

Worked ended recently to fill in the pit that consumed eight prized sports cars in early 2014. The repaired exhibit area has become a magnet for visitors, and the dirt-caked remains of the mangled cars are the stars.

Where the 60-foot-long, 45-foot-wide, 30-foot-deep sinkhole once drew gasps from visitors, now it's the remains of the worst-damaged cars that get astonished looks.

Yellow tape marks the boundaries of the hole that became a sensation and put the museum on the map. In the gift shop, jars of sinkhole dirt and rocks fetch $10 apiece.