MILITARY

Senate Armed Services chairman says nuclear deal paves way for Iran to develop atomic weapon

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter waves as he arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Defense Secretary Ash Carter waves as he arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

  • From left, Secretary of State John Kerry, Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz prepare to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    From left, Secretary of State John Kerry, Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz prepare to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

  • Secretary of State John Kerry arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to testify before a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Secretary of State John Kerry arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to testify before a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

The Republican chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee is blasting the Iranian nuclear deal, saying the agreement paves the way for Iran to develop an atomic weapon and gives the country billions of dollars for a "shopping spree" on the international arms market.

Sen. John McCain of Arizona criticized the deal at a hearing on Wednesday. At year five, he says, Iran will be free to acquire fighter aircraft, attack helicopters and warships. McCain says that at year eight, Iran will be able to acquire material for more sophisticated ballistic missiles.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter defended the deal, saying it is only one part of the U.S. strategy and that America is moving "full speed ahead" to confront Iran and the Islamic State's malign activities in the region.