MILITARY

NSA to stop using, and will ultimately destroy, the American calling records it has collected

FILE - In this June 6, 2013, file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus on in Fort Meade, Md. The Obama administration has decided that the National Security Agency will soon stop using millions of American calling records it collected under a controversial program leaked by former agency contractor Edward Snowden. The Director of National Intelligence said July 27,  that as of Nov. 29, those records would no longer be examined in terrorism investigations, and would be destroyed as soon as possible. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

FILE - In this June 6, 2013, file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus on in Fort Meade, Md. The Obama administration has decided that the National Security Agency will soon stop using millions of American calling records it collected under a controversial program leaked by former agency contractor Edward Snowden. The Director of National Intelligence said July 27, that as of Nov. 29, those records would no longer be examined in terrorism investigations, and would be destroyed as soon as possible. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)  (The Associated Press)

The Obama administration has decided that the National Security Agency will soon stop using millions of American calling records it collected under a controversial program leaked by former agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Congress passed a law earlier this year ending the NSA's bulk collection of American calling records after a six-month transition, but officials weren't sure what they would do about records going back five years that are currently being stored.

The Director of National Intelligence said Monday that as of Nov. 29, those records would no longer be examined in terrorism investigations, and would be destroyed as soon as possible. The statement said that pending lawsuits prohibit immediate destruction of the records.