Ohio

Cleveland serial killer of 11 women seeks new trial over closing of evidence session

  • In this Sept. 12, 2011 photo, Anthony Sowell sits in court in Cleveland during a pre-trial hearing. The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing arguments by attorneys for Sowell that he deserves a new trial because a hearing about the suppression of evidence was closed to the public. The 55-year-old received the death penalty in 2011 for killing 11 women whose remains were found in and around his home. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    In this Sept. 12, 2011 photo, Anthony Sowell sits in court in Cleveland during a pre-trial hearing. The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing arguments by attorneys for Sowell that he deserves a new trial because a hearing about the suppression of evidence was closed to the public. The 55-year-old received the death penalty in 2011 for killing 11 women whose remains were found in and around his home. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Sept. 12, 2011 photo, Anthony Sowell sits in court in Cleveland during a pre-trial hearing. The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing arguments by attorneys for Sowell that he deserves a new trial because a hearing about the suppression of evidence was closed to the public. The 55-year-old received the death penalty in 2011 for killing 11 women whose remains were found in and around his home. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    In this Sept. 12, 2011 photo, Anthony Sowell sits in court in Cleveland during a pre-trial hearing. The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing arguments by attorneys for Sowell that he deserves a new trial because a hearing about the suppression of evidence was closed to the public. The 55-year-old received the death penalty in 2011 for killing 11 women whose remains were found in and around his home. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)  (The Associated Press)

The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing arguments that a Cleveland killer of 11 women deserves a new trial because an evidence-suppression hearing was closed to the public.

Lawyers for Anthony Sowell (SOH'-wehl) also say a new trial is warranted because the judge in the case shielded the individual questioning of potential jurors.

Prosecutors agree that Sowell deserves a new hearing over the suppression of statements made to the police but not a new trial.

Both sides filed arguments last week as part of the court's consideration of Sowell's overall appeal of his conviction and death sentence.

The 55-year-old Sowell was sentenced in 2011 for killing the women whose remains were found in and around his home.