CRIME

News organizations: No evidence that cameras would intimidate theater shooting witnesses

FILE - This June 4, 2013 file photo shows Aurora theater shooting suspect James Holmes in court in Centennial, Colo. Prosecutors in the Colorado theater shooting case joined defense lawyers in opposing television coverage inside the courtroom during the trial, saying it would inflict intense and hurtful attention on victims who testify. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Andy Cross, Pool, File)

FILE - This June 4, 2013 file photo shows Aurora theater shooting suspect James Holmes in court in Centennial, Colo. Prosecutors in the Colorado theater shooting case joined defense lawyers in opposing television coverage inside the courtroom during the trial, saying it would inflict intense and hurtful attention on victims who testify. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Andy Cross, Pool, File)  (The Associated Press)

Attorneys for news organizations say there's no evidence that courtroom cameras would intimidate witnesses or violate defendant James Holmes' rights in the Colorado theater shootings trial.

In a court filing released Wednesday, the attorneys said objections raised by prosecutors and the defense to video and still photography are unfounded.

The media attorneys say cameras would give the public broader access to an important trial and improve understanding of the judicial system.

Holmes is scheduled to go on trial Dec. 8 on multiple charges of murder and attempted murder. He's accused of killing 12 people and injuring 70 in the 2012 attack. He pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

The Associated Press is among the news organizations asking to place one still camera and one video camera in the courtroom.