RELIGION

At Mass for slain US journalist James Foley, a New Hampshire bishop says: He opened our eyes

  • A woman holds a candle during a vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Several hundred people attended and paid tribute to the freelance American journalist who was killed earlier in the week by Islamic State militants. Foley was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    A woman holds a candle during a vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Several hundred people attended and paid tribute to the freelance American journalist who was killed earlier in the week by Islamic State militants. Foley was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)  (The Associated Press)

  • Candles are lighted on the town common during a vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Foley, a freelance journalist, was killed earlier in the week by Islamic State militants. He was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    Candles are lighted on the town common during a vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Foley, a freelance journalist, was killed earlier in the week by Islamic State militants. He was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)  (The Associated Press)

  • Irene Harvey reaches over Barbara Bush to light her candle during a candlelight vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Foley, a freelance journalist, was killed earlier this week by Islamic State militants. He was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    Irene Harvey reaches over Barbara Bush to light her candle during a candlelight vigil for James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014. Foley, a freelance journalist, was killed earlier this week by Islamic State militants. He was abducted in November 2012 while covering fighting in Syria. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)  (The Associated Press)

A Roman Catholic bishop in New Hampshire says slain U.S. journalist James Foley was living his faith by showing the world images of people affected by war.

Bishop Peter Libasci (lih-BAH'-shee) spoke Sunday at a Mass of Remembrance in Foley's hometown of Rochester. The bishop says even after Foley was captured for the first time in Libya in 2011, "he went back again that we might open our eyes."

The Mass was attended by Foley's parents and hundreds of others.

Foley was kidnapped on Thanksgiving Day 2012 while covering the Syrian uprising. The Islamic State posted a Web video Tuesday showing his killing and said it was in retaliation for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq.