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Florida expected to surpass NY in population, Sunshine State embodies 21st century America

  • In this Saturday, Dec. 21, 2013 photo, in Orlando, Fla., Adam Mayfield explains he moved to Florida because he knew he could easily find a job in Orlando after he was laid off in Atlanta last year. Sometime in 2014, Florida will surpass New York in population and become the nation’s third-most populous state. (AP Photo/John Raoux)The Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2013 photo, swimmers enjoy the clear waters of Wekiva Springs at the Wekiva Springs State Park in Apopka, Fla. Sometime in 2014 Florida will surpass New York in population and the state’s primary source of water from the Florida Aquifer is becoming smaller due to the growth in population. (AP Photo/John Raoux)The Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2013 photo, the clear waters of Wekiva Springs are seen at the Wekiva Spring State Park in Apopka, Fla. Sometime in 2014, Florida will surpass New York in population and the state’s primary source of water from the Florida Aquifer is becoming smaller due to the growth in population. (AP Photo/John Raoux)The Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013 photo, Bruce Stephenson, an environmental studies professor at Rollins College Winter Park, Fla., talks about Florida's growth. Sometime in 2014, Florida will surpass New York in population and become the nation’s third-most populous state.(AP Photo/John Raoux)The Associated Press

Sometime this year, Florida will surpass New York State in population, becoming the nation's third-most populous state, and sun-seeking seniors are not driving the growth.

Census figures released earlier this week showed New York State had just a 98,000-person lead over Florida last July, as both states near having 20 million residents.

An Associated Press analysis shows it isn't seniors driving the growth in migration to Florida. Seniors accounted for less than 10 percent of new residents over the last several years.

Instead, more than half of the new arrivals were between 25 and 64, and almost two-fifths of them were under age 25.

Ex-New Yorkers are the biggest domestic source of new Floridians, and migrants from Latin America dominated the newly-arrived Floridians from outside the United States.