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Chicago police changing response to 911 calls

Jan. 28, 2013: In this file photo, Chicago Police First Deputy Superintendent Alfonsa Wysinger, second from left, speaks at a news conference in Chicago with a display of recently seized guns, part of the 574 that had been seized in the city since Jan. 1. The mounting homicide toll in President Barack Obamas hometown is giving ammunition to both sides in the nations debate about gun rights and safety. The city suffered through its deadliest January in more than a decade.

Jan. 28, 2013: In this file photo, Chicago Police First Deputy Superintendent Alfonsa Wysinger, second from left, speaks at a news conference in Chicago with a display of recently seized guns, part of the 574 that had been seized in the city since Jan. 1. The mounting homicide toll in President Barack Obamas hometown is giving ammunition to both sides in the nations debate about gun rights and safety. The city suffered through its deadliest January in more than a decade.  (AP)

Chicago authorities are revamping how police respond to 911 calls in hopes of freeing up more officers to respond to the most serious crimes.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that starting Sunday officers won't respond in person to lesser crimes. Those include vehicle theft or incidents where the victim is safe and doesn't need medical attention.

Those calls will go to another department and police reports taken over the phone.

The move is expected to make the equivalent of 44 police officers available and comes as the city has seen a spike in murders.

Deputy chief-of-patrol Steve Georgas says law enforcement agencies want to be more efficient. He says people are still getting service and it might be more convenient.

However, some aldermen question if it's a wise move.