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New Vegas zip line sends people soaring 50 stories above The Strip

Thrill seekers in Las Vegas now have a new, over-the-top attraction: the new Voo Doo zip line at the Rio All-Suites Hotel.

Set between the Rio's two towers, the ride looks like a stunt out of an action movie as it takes passengers on a nearly third-of-a-mile-long trip 50 stories above The Strip.

Tickets for the zip line are about $25, and it can take two people at a time.

Hitting speeds of over 30 miles per hour, it's not for the feint of heart.

"You're still strapped in, but your feet are dangling so it's a little scarier than I thought it would be," said Vanessa Bielecki, a Canadian tourist who took a ride.

The riders are buckled in the seat, the gate opens and then the seat is propelled down the zip line. Some customers who get to the top of the tower and see how high it is have to mentally prepare for the ride.

"I'm shaking actually," said Vanessa Cudal of Las Vegas.

After facing her fears, Cudal said she'd like to do it again. "It wasn't bad," she said. "It's scarier than what it looks."

FoxNews.com caught up with 78-year-old Carol Boraiko of Las Vegas who decided to celebrate birthdays on the ride with her 88-year-old husband, Carl.

"I wanted to do it for my birthday but I said why don't we just wait and both do it on your birthday," said Carol.

Most riders said the zip line feels like a mixture between sticking your head out of fast-moving car and an amusement park ride. Some said the panoramic view of Las Vegas from the towers is worth the cost alone.

The ride also focuses on safety. VooDoo Zip Line, ride managers, say the zip line passed all Clark County inspections before opening. Customers can't bring anything on with them and are swiped with a metal wand just to make sure.

And even though it's Vegas, no one drunk is allowed.

"All my employees are looking for alcohol, looking to see if they're intoxicated, looking to see if they can fill out and follow instruction," said zip line manager, Chris Lampa.

And  at the end there's a bonus. Not only does the ride send you flying down but it also brings you back up at over twenty miles an hour.

"Very much like a roller coaster," Carol said.

Only on this ride, you start from the top.

Matt Finn is part of the Junior Reporter program at Fox News. Get more information on the program here and follow them on Twitter: @FNCJrReporters