Apple

Apple Pay promised to make plastic obsolete. Then came wary shoppers, confused clerks

File photo: In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 17, 2014, Eddy Cue, Apple Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, demonstrates the new Apple Pay mobile payment system at a Whole Foods store in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

File photo: In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 17, 2014, Eddy Cue, Apple Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, demonstrates the new Apple Pay mobile payment system at a Whole Foods store in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)  (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Nancy Schrum watched curiously as a colleague from her law firm waved an iPhone above a credit-card reader to buy a Subway sandwich with Apple Pay earlier this year.

“I have that, but I’m afraid to use it,” said Ms. Schrum, who feared the technology wouldn’t work.

When Apple Inc. launched its mobile-payment service more than two years ago, it hoped to speed up the checkout process and, ultimately, to replace physical wallets for U.S. consumers.

Apple Pay has made significant headway, but Ms. Schrum’s wariness reflects a range of factors that analysts say have caused growth to undershoot their expectations, including security concerns about the service, retailers that don’t accept it, and Apple’s relatively paltry marketing.

This story originally appeared on The Wall Street Journal.