Microsoft

Microsoft scraps Skype for Windows Phone 7

A visitor walks past a Microsoft booth at a computer software expo in Beijing, June 2, 2010. Microsoft Corp appears to be the latest U.S. company targeted by China for anti-trust investigation after government officials paid sudden visits to the software firm's Chinese offices on July 28, 2014. Picture taken June 2, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA - RTR40GLI

A visitor walks past a Microsoft booth at a computer software expo in Beijing, June 2, 2010. Microsoft Corp appears to be the latest U.S. company targeted by China for anti-trust investigation after government officials paid sudden visits to the software firm's Chinese offices on July 28, 2014. Picture taken June 2, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA - RTR40GLI  (REUTERS/Stringer )

Got a Windows Phone 8 or 8.1 device? Skype’s available. Got an iDevice? No problem for Skype. Got an Android machine? Load it up. Got the Amazon Fire phone or Kindle Fire tablet? Bring it on. Got a Nokia X product? You’re good to go. Got a BlackBerry 10 phone? It’s in the store. Got a handset running Microsoft-made Windows Phone 7? Er, sorry.

In a recent post on Skype’s support site, the Microsoft-owned company said it’s decided to scrap the software for Windows Phone 7.

A couple of years back, many were baffled as to why it was taking Skype so long to launch a version of its Internet phone software for Windows Phone 7, after all, the company was by that time already under Microsoft ownership. Eventually, a compatible version did appear, and was presumably warmly welcomed by Windows Phone users looking for a cheap way to make calls.

Fast forward to today and the very same people may once again be scratching their heads wondering why Skype has decided to ax the software for their devices.

Related: How Skype works

In its post, Skype said that it was “permanently retiring all Skype apps for Windows Phone 7″ so that “everyone can benefit from the latest improvements.” Everyone except Windows Phone 7 users, that is.

The company recommended that users with a subscription should take the necessary steps to cancel it “to avoid being billed in the future,” and then apply for a refund. Alternatively, they could continue to make use of their subscription using Skype on their computer or on another mobile platform (listed above).

While you might imagine there aren’t too many Windows Phone 7 users out there these days – most who stuck with the platform have likely upgraded to the latest version by now – a quick look through the Skype forums reveals a few folk upset by the news.

One, identified as braintwee, wrote, “I was going to get a WinPhone 8. Going to get an iPhone instead. Who knows what MS will refuse to support in the future,” while IvanAndrei09 said, “This is the worst decision from Skype. Upgrade to Windows Phone 8? No thanks, I’ll upgrade my phone to Android or iOS buying new phone.”

All is not lost, however, as similar services such as Viber, Tango, and Google Hangouts continue to run on the early version of Microsoft’s mobile operating system.