In a mid-April series during the 2010 season, Washington Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond collided with Milwaukee Brewers catcher Gregg Zaun on a play at the plate.

Zaun would continue to play for the Brewers for another month, playing through the pain until he couldn't any longer -- he reinjured it on a swing in May. It turned out Zaun had torn his labrum in his right shoulder and his season, as well as his career, was over.

To take Zaun's place on the roster, the Brewers called up their third-round pick from 2007 -- Jonathan Lucroy.

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It took a week or so, but Lucroy quickly became Milwaukee's main catcher, a role he'd hold until being traded to Texas on Monday.

In those seven seasons, Lucroy became arguably the best hitting catcher in Brewers history (as well as one of the top fan favorites).

A two-time time All-Star who twice batted better than .300 in a season, Lucroy tied the club record for doubles with 53 in 2014. He has the most home runs by a catcher in Brewers history and also is tops in batting average, slugging percentage and OPS.

Lucroy's main "competitors" are Charlie Moore and B.J. Surhoff. Like Lucroy, who played some first base and designated hitter, Moore and Surhoff played other positions with the Brewers. Moore would appear in 850 games behind the plate in his 15 seasons in Milwaukee, Lucroy 725 and Surhoff 704. However, for our purposes (because this is how baseball-reference.com spits it out), we use the total career stats for the players, regardless of position, the only caveat being catcher had to be the main position in his career.

In addition to the above-mentioned statistics, among all-time Brewers catchers, Lucroy is third in games, plate appearances, at-bats, runs, hits, doubles, triples, RBI, stolen bases and on-base percentage as well as fourth in walks. Lucroy also recently passed Moore for most strikeouts.

Here's the statistics for every Brewers catcher who played at least 500 games in Milwaukee franchise history:

Player

Years

G

PA

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

SB

BA

OBP

SLG

Charlie Moore

1973-86

1283

4358

3926

441

1029

177

42

35

401

51

.262

.320

.355

B.J. Surhoff

1987-95

1102

4304

3884

472

1064

194

24

57

524

102

.274

.323

.380

Jonathan Lucroy

2010-16

805

3137

2838

346

806

157

19

79

387

29

.284

.342

.436

Darrell Porter

1971-76

537

2009

1706

224

391

63

12

54

226

19

.229

.334

.375

Mike Matheny

1994-98

445

1278

1172

100

271

56

4

19

128

6

.231

.278

.334

Ellie Rodriguez

1971-73

325

1152

964

89

246

32

4

3

95

6

.255

.357

.306

Bill Schroeder

1983-88

317

1153

1066

130

262

44

1

51

128

6

.246

.291

.432

Martin Maldonado

2011-16

315

946

844

76

185

29

1

24

99

1

.219

.294

.341

Jason Kendall

2008-09

285

1113

968

94

236

49

4

4

92

15

.244

.329

.315

Damian Miller

2005-07

273

1013

902

103

232

62

1

19

105

1

.257

.324

.391

Jerry McNertney

1969-70*

239

779

706

66

171

29

2

14

77

2

.242

.296

.348

Jesse Levis

1996-2001

237

590

503

56

133

15

1

2

47

2

.264

.360

.310

Buck Martinez

1978-80

234

738

671

59

158

27

1

8

63

2

.235

.271

.314

Henry Blanco

2000-01

197

681

598

62

133

42

3

13

62

3

.222

.303

.368

Chad Moeller

2004-06

196

669

614

57

125

25

2

14

55

0

.204

.257

.319

Raul Casanova

2000-02

188

572

510

44

123

24

3

18

77

1

.241

.311

.406

Charlie O'Brien

1987-90

158

559

486

47

104

26

3

8

55

0

.214

.290

.329

* - The 1969 season was with the Seattle Pilots

So long Jonathan Lucroy. You might be gone, but won't be forgotten. At least in the record book.

Statistics courtesy baseball-reference.com's Play Index

Dave Heller is the author of the upcoming book Ken Williams: A Slugger in Ruth's Shadow as well as Facing Ted Williams Players From the Golden Age of Baseball Recall the Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived and As Good As It Got: The 1944 St. Louis Browns