Northeast

Murdered NYPD cop: Called hero in death by same people who saw him as villain while alive

  • A picture of Brian Moore is displayed amongst flowers and candles at a memorial in front of his precinct house in the Queens section of New York, Tuesday, May 5, 2015.  The 25-year-old Moore died Monday, two days after he was shot. He had been in a coma after undergoing brain surgery.  Demetrius Blackwell will be charged with first-degree murder, prosecutors said. He was charged earlier with attempted murder and other crimes. He is being held without bail and has not entered a plea.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    A picture of Brian Moore is displayed amongst flowers and candles at a memorial in front of his precinct house in the Queens section of New York, Tuesday, May 5, 2015. The 25-year-old Moore died Monday, two days after he was shot. He had been in a coma after undergoing brain surgery. Demetrius Blackwell will be charged with first-degree murder, prosecutors said. He was charged earlier with attempted murder and other crimes. He is being held without bail and has not entered a plea.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

  • Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner William Bratton speak at a news conference Saturday night, May 2, 2015, at Jamaica Hospital in Queens, New York,  after a New York City police officer was shot and critically wounded. Detectives were still investigating Sunday after arresting 35-year-old Demitrius Blackwell in the shooting of Officer Brian Moore.  (AP Photo/Mike Balsamo)

    Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner William Bratton speak at a news conference Saturday night, May 2, 2015, at Jamaica Hospital in Queens, New York, after a New York City police officer was shot and critically wounded. Detectives were still investigating Sunday after arresting 35-year-old Demitrius Blackwell in the shooting of Officer Brian Moore. (AP Photo/Mike Balsamo)  (The Associated Press)

  • A police officer looks over a memorial for Brian Moore in front of the 105th precinct house in the Queens section of New York, Tuesday, May 5, 2015. The 25-year-old Moore died Monday, two days after he was shot. He had been in a coma after undergoing brain surgery.  Demetrius Blackwell will be charged with first-degree murder, prosecutors said. He was charged earlier with attempted murder and other crimes. He is being held without bail and has not entered a plea.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    A police officer looks over a memorial for Brian Moore in front of the 105th precinct house in the Queens section of New York, Tuesday, May 5, 2015. The 25-year-old Moore died Monday, two days after he was shot. He had been in a coma after undergoing brain surgery. Demetrius Blackwell will be charged with first-degree murder, prosecutors said. He was charged earlier with attempted murder and other crimes. He is being held without bail and has not entered a plea.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

If you are grateful for small things, it is a good sign that even constant critics of the police are denouncing the murder of NYPD cop Brian Moore. No less than President Obama, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Al Sharpton have expressed outrage and offered condolences.

Brian Moore was only 25. There can be no justice for him, and the only peace he will know is the peace of the grave. In death, he is called a hero by some of the same people who, while he was alive, saw him only as a villain.

Their remarks are welcome, with Sharpton calling the murder an “unpardonable crime.” His comments reinforce the old-fashioned idea that attacking law enforcement is out of bounds, always and everywhere.

Brian Moore was only 25. There can be no justice for him, and the only peace he will know is the peace of the grave. In death, he is called a hero by some of the same people who, while he was alive, saw him only as a villain.

Unfortunately, however, the progressive ringleaders could also have a less noble motive for joining the common-sense chorus. Maybe they concluded that dead cops are bad for business.

In their day jobs, all three routinely make excuses for those who break the law and blast cops first and get the facts later. Each offered encouragement to the law-breaking rabble known as Occupy Wall Street and expressed varying degrees of support for anti-police protesters in New York, Baltimore and Ferguson, Mo., even as they criticized arsonists and looters.

The effort to separate good protesters from bad rioters is doomed to fail because too many people in both groups are motivated by hatred for cops. Fanning that flame while expecting to control the damage is mission impossible, even for Sharpton and the skilled community organizers in the White House and City Hall.

Recall that some anti-police protesters in New York last December chanted, “What do we want? Dead cops” a week before Officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos were assassinated. Only then did de Blasio stop praising the protesters and letting them shut down highways and invade stores with impunity.

To continue reading Michael Goodwin's column in the New York Post, click here.

Michael Goodwin is a Fox News contributor and New York Post columnist.