Krauthammer on Sally Yates: ‘The new star for liberal America’

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that acting Attorney General Sally Yates’ decision not to defend President Trump’s executive order on immigration was entirely wrong – and wholly motivated by politics.

“She will now have her 15 minutes as the new star for liberal America,” Krauthammer said. “It's just a way to play to the base. Ask anyone who is defending her and saying how principled were Sally Yates' actions. Ask her what was illegal about the executive order. I've heard a lot of constitutional lawyers… who vehemently oppose the Trump policy, but say she was absolutely wrong in what she did. She has no leg to stand on.”

Krauthammer went on to say that the president was justified in his decision to fire Yates, adding that she could have resigned if she believed the executive order was unconstitutional or unlawful; rather, he said, she chose to satisfy the anger of the Democratic electorate.

“[Democrats, including Yates] feel they have to show zeal. They have… no chance of overturning the order, so they have to pretend. It's kabuki,” he concluded.

Krauthammer on Sally Yates: ‘The new star for liberal America’

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that acting Attorney General Sally Yates’ decision not to defend President Trump’s executive order on immigration was entirely wrong – and wholly motivated by politics.

“She will now have her 15 minutes as the new star for liberal America,” Krauthammer said. “It's just a way to play to the base. Ask anyone who is defending her and saying how principled were Sally Yates' actions. Ask her what was illegal about the executive order. I've heard a lot of constitutional lawyers… who vehemently oppose the Trump policy, but say she was absolutely wrong in what she did. She has no leg to stand on.”

Krauthammer went on to say that the president was justified in his decision to fire Yates, adding that she could have resigned if she believed the executive order was unconstitutional or unlawful; rather, he said, she chose to satisfy the anger of the Democratic electorate.

“[Democrats, including Yates] feel they have to show zeal. They have… no chance of overturning the order, so they have to pretend. It's kabuki,” he concluded.

EXCLUSIVE: Pentagon believes attack on Saudi frigate meant for American warship

By Lucas Tomlinson

The Pentagon believes the suicide attack by Iranian- backed Houthi rebels targeting a Saudi frigate off the coast of Yemen may have been meant for an American warship, two defense officials tell Fox News.

The incident in question occurred in the southern Red Sea Monday. Two Saudi sailors were killed, 3 wounded. At first it was thought to be the result of a missile.

But based on new analysis of a video showing the yesterday's attack American intelligence officials now believe this was in fact a suicide bomber whose small boat rammed the side of the Saudi vessel.

In the audio heard on the video, a voice narrating the attack shouts in Arabic, "Death to America, Death to Israel, Death to the Jews."

U.S. defense analysts now believe those behind the attack either thought the bomber was striking an American warship or this was a “dress rehearsal” similar to the attack on the USS Cole, according to one official.

The attack Monday near the Bab al Mandab Strait connecting the Red Sea to Gulf of Aden occurred in the same area where US Navy warships came under missile attack in October near  the coast of Yemen.

An American destroyer shot down those incoming missiles-- the first successful engagement in combat using an American SM-2 missile.

USS Nitze, an American destroyer retaliated two days later launching Tomahawk missiles on October 13 at multiple Houthi radar sites in Yemen - that was in October.

This latest incident came a day after President Trump spoke by phone with the Saudi King, to discuss setting up safe zones for refugees in Syria and Yemen. Senior US defense officials who we have spoken to today say they are concerned by this latest incident but are confident American warships can defend themselves against

The United States has supported a Saudi-led air campaign against Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen since 2015.

Riley on May press conference: “This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump.”

The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley told viewers Friday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that President Donald Trump “was in fine form” at his first press conference as president today.

“This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump,” Riley said.

The press conference was a joint appearance with visiting British Prime Minister Theresa May. Riley noted that Trump took a more measured tone than usual.

“He was careful with his words. Very measured even when he got a couple of aggressive questions from some foreign media outlets,” commented Riley, adding, “I think we’ll have to see more of this if he wants a successful presidency but today I think he got the job done.”

President Trump to announce pick to fill vacant SCOTUS seat

Steve Hayes on Obama commuting Manning sentence: “It’s a disgrace and it’s not a surprise from this president.”

Steve Hayes told viewers Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that when it comes to President Obama’s decision to commute the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, “It’s a disgrace and it’s not a surprise from this president.”

“The damage that these leaks did is not theoretical. It’s real, it’s clear, and it’s demonstrable,” Hayes added.

Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, has been serving out a 35-year sentence after leaking classified information to Wikileaks. She will now leave prison nearly three decades ahead of time after spending more than six years in jail. 

US transferring 4 Gitmo detainees to UAE and Saudi Arabia, US officials

The US military will transfer four more Gitmo detainees this week ahead of President Obama leaving office Friday, two US officials with knowledge of the transfers tell Fox News.

Three detainees will be sent to the United Arab Emirates and one to Saudi Arabia on two separate US military flights, the officials said.

41 detainees will remain at Gitmo after the latest transfers are complete.  It is not immediately clear if any more transfers will take place before President Obama leaves office Friday.

President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to end detainee transfers from Gitmo after taking office Friday.

The four detainees are expected to depart Gitmo Wednesday and arrive in UAE and Saudi Arabia Thursday, the officials said.

The Pentagon does not typically acknowledge detainee transfers until at least 24 after they arrive in third-party nations.

Earlier this week, 10 detainees were transferred to Oman.

In August, 15 Gitmo detainees were sent to the UAE in the largest single transfer to date. 

Juan Williams discusses Trump tweets on Rep. John Lewis

On “Special Report with Bret Baier” Monday, Fox News Contributor Juan Williams discussed President-elect Donald Trump’s Twitter reaction to Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who said in an interview with NBC that he doesn’t see Trump as a “legitimate President.”

“I think a lot of people, specifically people who know Civil Rights history, but I would say in particular black Americans of a certain age are just turned out, just think, ‘What is he saying? You can't say that about this guy,’” said Williams.

Trump took to Twitter the day after Congressman Lewis’ comments aired, saying in part that Lewis is “All talk, talk, talk - no action or results. Sad!” This was seen by critics as an untimely attack against a Civil Rights leader, just days before the federal holiday celebrating Martin Luther King Jr.

Williams also said the visit by Martin Luther King III to Trump tower on Monday was not a demonstration of reaching out.  

“[Trump] didn't take any questions…retreating into the elevator,” said Williams. “I hope he does more on Inauguration Day.”

Goldberg on Obamacare Repeal: “This is a very difficult position that the Republicans are in”

Fox News Contributor and National Review Senior Editor Jonah Goldberg said Wednesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that despite repeated promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act under the new 115th congress, “this is a very difficult position that the Republicans are in.”

Vice President-elect Gov. Mike Pence (R-IN) took to Capitol Hill on Wednesday to meet with congressional Republicans on the first full workday for the new Congress. After meeting with the House Republican Conference, Pence told reporters  “the American people have spoken.  They want to see us repeal and replace Obamacare, and today, my message to members of Congress is that we are going to be in the promise-keeping business, and the first order of business is to keep our promise to repeal Obamacare and replace it.”

Meanwhile, House Speaker Paul Ryan noted that after repealing Obamacare, as they work to implement a replacement plan House Republicans “want to make sure as we give relief to people through Obamacare, we do it in transition that doesn't pull the rug out from anybody  during that transition period.”

But even as the Vice President and congressional Republicans reiterated their pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare, Goldberg noted that doing so may not prove as simple as it sounds: “a lot of Obamacare passed with 60 votes, so you can't get rid of those parts through reconciliation.

“You can't keep all of the popular parts of Obamacare, which Donald Trump promises to do, and still call it repeal, it's something else. And lastly, because of Obamacare's own internal flaws, it's sort of like a suicidal dying patient and the Republicans are leaping in to be the doctor of record for the patient, and that's a real political problem for them. They can make it die faster, but they can't save it and they can't get a replacement for it very soon either.”

Krauthammer on Schumer pronouncement America can’t afford a Twitter presidency: “Sore loser”

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that new Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s pronouncement that America “can’t afford a Twitter presidency” is mostly baseless.

“Sore loser,” Krauthammer said. “The tweets are working. I mean, if they weren’t, they wouldn’t be using them… Trump has used [Twitter] on North Korea, he’s used it on Ford, General Motors… and it works.”

Krauthammer went on to say that while Twitter has proven to be an effective mode of communication for the President-elect, Trump may not find it as useful after he is sworn in as president.

“I think when he's in office, it'll be a little more problematic, because people will be presuming policy out of this,” he said, concluding, “It's hard to be either detailed or specific enough in a tweet to actually make coherent policy.”

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