Celebrity News

David Hasselhoff Talks Silly New Roles in 'Sharknado' and 'Killing Hasselhoff'

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 (Reuters)

David Hasselhoff just wants to entertain. That's all he's ever wanted, from his early work on daytime soaps through his new gig as a variety host. 

"I’m an entertainer," he tells FOX News Magazine. "You can’t pigeonhole me into any one thing. I'm not saying I'm great at anything, but I’m good at what I do." 

Right now, what Hasselhoff is doing is preparing for his upcoming turns in "Sharknado 3" and "Killing Hasselhoff," and having some fun with a new Clorox campaign in the meantime.

"They came to me saying, 'We’d like you to interact with some fans, go into their homes, and have a blast,' Hasselhoff explains of his recent #HassleOffDay project, whereby fans could enter to win a personal home-cleaning session from Homejoy and The Hoff himself.

“It’s just a way of advertising in a positive, entertaining way," he says. "Also, it's funny."

Hasselhoff is actually all about the funny these days. Case in point: his aforementioned role as Ian Ziering's father in "Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!"

"It doesn't make sense at all, but it's a lot of fun," he explains. "[Ian Ziering's character] comes to me to save the world, and I’m pissed off at the world because I was an astronaut and I never got to space … I was a guilty father, and I didn’t know he had a daughter, and we renew our love for each other by driving a shuttle into outer space."

"It’s the world’s stupidest, craziest, nuttiest movie, and it’s going to be a big success," he adds.

Hasselhoff is also hoping his next film project, "Killing Hasselhoff," is just as big. It's about a guy (Ken Jeong) who enters into a celebrity death pool with some friends, only to resort to trying to kill Hasselhoff to ensure a victory.

"It's one of the funniest, if not the funniest script I've ever read," Hoff says. "I bought it on the spot."

Of course, a big part of the film depends on Hasselhoff being able to poke fun at his own persona, and luckily, The Hoff is always game. “When [the characters] get to David Hasselhoff’s house, it’s like Hugh Hefner's," he explains with a laugh. "I've got girls running around and I’m listening to my own music.”

Even when he's not acting, Hasselhoff says he doesn't take himself too seriously. His new variety show in Scandanavia, for example, sees The Hoff interacting with all sorts of the area's big-name celebs — and he sometimes doesn't even know who they are before the interview.

"I find out on the spot," Hasselhoff admits. "They tell their story of how they got famous, and I tell my story, and we figure out a few songs together. Then I usually ask them where the sun is, because it's always night over there!" he jokes. "We just tried it out and we had a smash hit on our hands. We’re shooting now in Norway and Denmark; I'm trying to figure out how to bring it to America."

And figure it out he will: Hasselhoff oversees much of the production, and that's just how he likes it. 

"I really like producing, he says. "If I just go on and I’m told what to do, I clam up. But if I can do the whole thing, I’m using all my senses. That stuff really turns me on … and the live stuff is really what's most exciting. It can so easily go wrong, and it puts you in a place where — like jumping out of an airplane — you just gotta land."

That's a philosophy he incorporates into his day-to-day life, as well. 

"Last year, I did the Gumball [3000] Rally," he says, referring to an annual 3000-mile race through (mostly) Europe. "We tricked out a car like KITT, and it goes from 0 to 60 in something like 2 seconds. So we drive, and it's really fun to see the people in Latvia, or Lithuania, out in the middle of nowhere, waving when they see us. But if I got stopped [by police], I'd just jump out and say 'Hey!' and I'd never get a ticket. If I get them going, and laughing, I can talk my way out of it."

Of course, that's probably easier when you're an entertainer like David Hasselhoff. He's really is pretty good at what he does.