ENTERTAINMENT

Ricky Martin Sued For Plagiarism Over World Cup Song 'Vida'

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 27:  Ricky Martin performs during the ceremony of the World Music Awards 2014 at Sporting Monte-Carlo on May 27, 2014 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 27: Ricky Martin performs during the ceremony of the World Music Awards 2014 at Sporting Monte-Carlo on May 27, 2014 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

Puerto Rican superstar Ricky Martin had one of the best World Cup anthems for this year’s tournament in Brazil, but a new lawsuit is saying he stole it from an aspiring artist.

Luis Adrian Cortes Ramos, once a finalist of "Idol Puerto Rico," filed the lawsuit in federal court Wednesday claiming Martin’s “Vida,” which won through the competition “SuperSong” with Sony, was almost identical to a song he composed and submitted but never received recognition for.

Ramos is demanding $10 million from the singer and Sony Corporation, according to El Nacional, a newspaper from Venezuela.

Court documents indicate that Martin and Sony took part in a public contest – “SuperSong” – aimed at finding a new song for the FIFA World Cup in Brazil held earlier this summer.

“They stated the winning composer would be recognized and he would be given credit for his work,” the documents said.

Ramos alleges he learned about the contest and submitted a song with a music video he filmed in his hometown of Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico, at the end of 2013. He was selected as one of the 20 finalists, the lawsuit reads.

After that, paperwork was sent to him via email to sign and send back to Brazil. Ramos said he sent the signed documents on Jan. 16 and more than 10 days later received another email confirming his mailing address because it was incorrect.

On January 30, the top five finalists were selected, according to the lawsuit, but Ramos’ name was not on the list. Three months later, Martin released his World Cup single “Vida.”

“Ramos was surprised, disillusioned and suffered mental anguish because the song was almost identical to the one he composed. Until that moment, Martin was an idol for Ramos,” the lawsuit said.

The aspiring artist claims he was poorly informed and cheated by contest officials who allegedly violated copyright laws.

Martin’s rep Helga Garcia told El Nacional she would not be making an direct comments toward the lawsuit, saying it was in the hands of the Sony Music legal team.

“That is all we can tell you at the moment,” she said.

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