Breaking mold, some Russian youth speak out against Putin

Russian President Vladimir Putin's legacy depends not only on being re-elected Sunday — but also on ensuring that today's first-time voters stay loyal to his vision.

Polls show that nationwide, young people are among Putin's most ardent supporters. But in Moscow many twenty-somethings are frustrated with income inequality, corruption and other problems.

A linguistics student, a local councilor, a blogger and others are among those speaking out after a lifetime under Putin's all-powerful rule. Some support challengers like TV star Ksenia Sobchak or communist Pavel Grudinin. Others support opposition leader Alexei Navalny, barred from the election, and will boycott the vote.

Putin meets Thursday with young volunteers, computer programmers and others seeking to join the civil service as part of a government outreach program to improve opportunities for talented youth.