TERRORISM

UN study: Extremist fighters lack good education and jobs

A U.N. study of 43 people who left their countries to become "foreign terrorist fighters" in Syria has found that most came from disadvantaged backgrounds, lacked good education and decent jobs — and saw their Muslim religion "in terms of justice and injustice rather than in terms of piety and spirituality."

The study for the U.N. Counter-Terrorism Center released Thursday said based on interviews with the 42 men and one woman, a typical "foreign terrorist fighter," or FTF, is most likely to be young, male and feel "their life lacked meaning."

But Professor Hamed el-Said of Manchester Metropolitan University and British terrorism expert Richard Barrett, who conducted the study, said beyond that it's difficult to generalize why they wanted to go to Syria.