Europe

The Latest: EU urges Turkey to probe referendum vote

Supporters of the main opposition Republican People's Party, or CHP, chant slogans during a protest outside Istanbul's Court House, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Hundreds of people are queuing in front of Turkey's election board to submit petitions requesting that the electoral authority reverse a controversial decision during Sunday's referendum to accept ballots without official stamps. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Supporters of the main opposition Republican People's Party, or CHP, chant slogans during a protest outside Istanbul's Court House, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Hundreds of people are queuing in front of Turkey's election board to submit petitions requesting that the electoral authority reverse a controversial decision during Sunday's referendum to accept ballots without official stamps. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on Turkey's referendum on presidential powers (all times local):

1:30 p.m.

The European Union is calling on the Turkish authorities to launch "transparent investigations" into "alleged irregularities" during last weekend's referendum on increased powers for the country's presidency.

International election observers and opposition parties have reported numerous voting irregularities during the vote which President Recep Tayyip Erdogan won by a narrow margin.

EU Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas said the EU was encouraging "Turkey to move closer to the European Union again, and not to move even further and faster away from us."

Turkey's prime minister on Tuesday called on the opposition to respect the result of a referendum that will give sweeping new powers to the office of the president.

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12 p.m.

Turkey's prime minister has called on the opposition to respect the result of a referendum that will expand the powers of the office of the president.

In an address to legislators from his ruling party on Tuesday, Binali Yildirim said the people had voted to switch from a parliamentary to a presidential system, adding: the "opposition should not speak after the people have spoken."

An unofficial tally carried by the country's state-run news agency gave President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's "yes" camp a narrow win.

Opposition parties called for the vote to be annulled because of a series of irregularities, particularly an electoral board decision to accept ballots that didn't bear official stamps, as required by Turkish law.

International monitors said the move undermined safeguards against fraud.