Europe

Lawmakers warn UK to assess impact of 'no deal' Brexit

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May meets Jordanian Prime Minister Hani al-Mulqi in Amman, Jordan, Monday, April 3, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May has begun a visit to Jordan where she is to announce plans to send more British military trainers to help the kingdom's air force in the fight against Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/ Raad Adayleh)

    British Prime Minister Theresa May meets Jordanian Prime Minister Hani al-Mulqi in Amman, Jordan, Monday, April 3, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May has begun a visit to Jordan where she is to announce plans to send more British military trainers to help the kingdom's air force in the fight against Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/ Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, left, meets his German counterpart Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel at his residence in London, Tuesday, April 4, 2017. (Stefan Rousseau/Pool Photo via AP)

    Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, left, meets his German counterpart Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel at his residence in London, Tuesday, April 4, 2017. (Stefan Rousseau/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's Secretary of State for the Department for Exiting the European Union, David Davis, left, meets with the German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel at the Cabinet Office in London for talks Tuesday April 4, 2017.  Gabriel recently cast doubt on the two year timescale for Britain to negotiate its 'Brexit' exit from the European Union. ( Victoria Jones/Pool via AP)

    Britain's Secretary of State for the Department for Exiting the European Union, David Davis, left, meets with the German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel at the Cabinet Office in London for talks Tuesday April 4, 2017. Gabriel recently cast doubt on the two year timescale for Britain to negotiate its 'Brexit' exit from the European Union. ( Victoria Jones/Pool via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Parliament's Brexit committee says Britain's aim of forging a new deal with the European Union in two years may be unrealistic, and the government must set out the economic implications of failure.

Britain wants to strike a free-trade deal with the bloc, but Prime Minister Theresa May says leaving without a deal would be better than a bad deal. The Exiting the EU Committee says that assertion is not based on evidence.

The committee said Tuesday that "the government should conduct a thorough assessment of the economic, legal and other implications of leaving the EU without a deal in place."

The lawmakers also say "it is not yet evident" that the two-year timescale is realistic.

May says she believes details of the "future partnership" can be sealed within two years.