Asia

Japan Cabinet allows schools to study banned imperial order

  • FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2016 file photo, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference after he reshuffled his Cabinet at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo. Opposition politicians on Tuesday, April 4, criticized a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday, March 31. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2016 file photo, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference after he reshuffled his Cabinet at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo. Opposition politicians on Tuesday, April 4, criticized a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday, March 31. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Thursday, March 23, 2017 file photo, Yasunori Kagoike, head of an ultra-nationalistic Japanese school operator, gestures as he testifies before an upper house panel at the parliament in Tokyo over a land and political scandal in which Kagoike said Prime Minister Shinzo Abe donated 1 million yen ($9,000) in 2015 through his wife Akie Abe for an elementary school where she once was honorary principal. Opposition politicians criticized Tuesday, April 4, a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. Kagoike is among many Japanese conservatives who have tried to reinstate the imperial message. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    FILE - In this Thursday, March 23, 2017 file photo, Yasunori Kagoike, head of an ultra-nationalistic Japanese school operator, gestures as he testifies before an upper house panel at the parliament in Tokyo over a land and political scandal in which Kagoike said Prime Minister Shinzo Abe donated 1 million yen ($9,000) in 2015 through his wife Akie Abe for an elementary school where she once was honorary principal. Opposition politicians criticized Tuesday, April 4, a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. Kagoike is among many Japanese conservatives who have tried to reinstate the imperial message. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2017 file photo, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife Akie wave as Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko depart for Vietnam from the Haneda International Airport in Tokyo. Opposition politicians on Tuesday, April 4, criticized a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday, March 31. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)

    FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2017 file photo, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife Akie wave as Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko depart for Vietnam from the Haneda International Airport in Tokyo. Opposition politicians on Tuesday, April 4, criticized a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday, March 31. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)  (The Associated Press)

Opposition politicians are criticizing a decision by Japan's Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it's a sign that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government is becoming more nationalistic.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters Tuesday the Imperial Rescript on Education should be allowed as a teaching material if it is used in line with the constitution and the education law. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday.

Opposition politicians on Tuesday called the move unconstitutional and unacceptable.

The rescript, banned in 1948, calls on Japanese to sacrifice their lives for the emperor. It recently captured national attention because of a political scandal involving a school whose ultra-nationalistic owner used it.