Pacific

Being New Zealand's leader has its perks _ like tuna fishing

  • Former Prime Minister John Key waits to address parliament for his valedictory speech in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.  In his farewell speech to lawmakers on Wednesday,  Key recounted the time he visited the Marshall Islands in 2013 for a meeting of Pacific leaders and managed to squeeze in some deep-sea fishing. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    Former Prime Minister John Key waits to address parliament for his valedictory speech in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. In his farewell speech to lawmakers on Wednesday, Key recounted the time he visited the Marshall Islands in 2013 for a meeting of Pacific leaders and managed to squeeze in some deep-sea fishing. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former Prime Minister John Key addresses the parliament for the final time in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.  In his farewell speech to lawmakers on Wednesday,  Key recounted the time he visited the Marshall Islands in 2013 for a meeting of Pacific leaders and managed to squeeze in some deep-sea fishing. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    Former Prime Minister John Key addresses the parliament for the final time in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. In his farewell speech to lawmakers on Wednesday, Key recounted the time he visited the Marshall Islands in 2013 for a meeting of Pacific leaders and managed to squeeze in some deep-sea fishing. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, left, shakes hands with his successor Prime Minister Bill English following his valedictory speech to parliament in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Key was leader for eight years before resigning in December. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, left, shakes hands with his successor Prime Minister Bill English following his valedictory speech to parliament in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Key was leader for eight years before resigning in December. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

Being the leader of a small nation comes with its perks — like going tuna fishing.

In his farewell speech to lawmakers on Wednesday, former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key recounted the time he visited the Marshall Islands in 2013 for a meeting of Pacific leaders and managed to squeeze in some deep-sea fishing.

Key said then-U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron called him on a satellite phone to talk about Libya. But Cameron wondered what all the noise was in the background.

Don't worry, Key told him, we're fishing and I just caught a big tuna.

Key said there was a long silence before the British leader wistfully replied: "God, I wish I ran a small country."

Key was leader for eight years before resigning in December.