Europe

UN: Follow-up Cyprus security summit aimed for early March

  • U.N. Special Advisor of the Secretary-General Espen Barth Eide, left, and Cyprus' President Nicos Anastasiades talk during their meeting at the presidential palace in divided capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Eide meets with the Cypriot president following the continue peace talks with the rival leaders of the island. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

    U.N. Special Advisor of the Secretary-General Espen Barth Eide, left, and Cyprus' President Nicos Anastasiades talk during their meeting at the presidential palace in divided capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Eide meets with the Cypriot president following the continue peace talks with the rival leaders of the island. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.N. Special Advisor of the Secretary-General Espen Barth Eide, left, arrives at the presidential palace for a meeting with the Cyprus' President Nicos Anastasiades in divided capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Eide meets with the Cypriot president following the continue peace talks with the rival leaders of the island. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

    U.N. Special Advisor of the Secretary-General Espen Barth Eide, left, arrives at the presidential palace for a meeting with the Cyprus' President Nicos Anastasiades in divided capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Eide meets with the Cypriot president following the continue peace talks with the rival leaders of the island. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)  (The Associated Press)

A U.N. envoy says that the rival leaders of ethnically split Cyprus have asked the world body to prepare for a follow-up summit in early March that will aim to sort out security arrangements after the island is reunified.

Envoy Espen Barth Eide says that Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades and the leader of the breakaway Turkish Cypriots Mustafa Akinci will in the meantime meet weekly to narrow differences on other outstanding issues.

Anastasiades and Akinci along with the foreign ministers of Cyprus' "guarantors" — Britain, Greece and Turkey — met in Geneva last month to resolve the difficult issue. That meeting was suspended after differences proved too wide to bridge.

A 1974 Turkish invasion triggered by a coup aimed at union with Greece split Cyprus along ethnic lines.