Asia

Fans of bull-taming sport attack police station in India

  • A protestor holds a placard supporting Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming sport banned by India's top court, as thousands gather demanding that the sport be allowed to resume unhindered at the Marina beach in Chennai, India, Sunday, Jan.22, 2017. The sport was performed in parts of southern India on Sunday after Tamil Nadu state government signed an executive order Saturday allowing Jallikattu contests to take place Sunday. (AP Photo)

    A protestor holds a placard supporting Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming sport banned by India's top court, as thousands gather demanding that the sport be allowed to resume unhindered at the Marina beach in Chennai, India, Sunday, Jan.22, 2017. The sport was performed in parts of southern India on Sunday after Tamil Nadu state government signed an executive order Saturday allowing Jallikattu contests to take place Sunday. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Protestors hold placards demanding Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming sport banned by India's top court, be allowed to resume unhindered as thousands gather at the Marina beach in Chennai, India, Sunday, Jan.22, 2017. The sport was performed in parts of southern India on Sunday after Tamil Nadu state government signed an executive order Saturday allowing Jallikattu contests to take place Sunday. (AP Photo)

    Protestors hold placards demanding Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming sport banned by India's top court, be allowed to resume unhindered as thousands gather at the Marina beach in Chennai, India, Sunday, Jan.22, 2017. The sport was performed in parts of southern India on Sunday after Tamil Nadu state government signed an executive order Saturday allowing Jallikattu contests to take place Sunday. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Protestors supporting Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming ritual try to form a human chain as police try to remove them from the Marina beach on the Bay of Bengal coast in Chennai, India, Monday, Jan.23, 2017. Protestors attacked a police station with stones and set some vehicles on fire Monday in anger at being forcibly evicted from the beach where they been protesting for the past week in support of the sport. Jallikattu involves releasing a bull into a crowd of people who attempt to grab it and ride it. It is popular in Tamil Nadu state, but India's top court banned it in 2014 on grounds of animal cruelty. (AP Photo)

    Protestors supporting Jallikattu, a traditional bull-taming ritual try to form a human chain as police try to remove them from the Marina beach on the Bay of Bengal coast in Chennai, India, Monday, Jan.23, 2017. Protestors attacked a police station with stones and set some vehicles on fire Monday in anger at being forcibly evicted from the beach where they been protesting for the past week in support of the sport. Jallikattu involves releasing a bull into a crowd of people who attempt to grab it and ride it. It is popular in Tamil Nadu state, but India's top court banned it in 2014 on grounds of animal cruelty. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

Protesters demanding the resumption of traditional bull-taming contests in southern India have attacked a police station with stones and set some vehicles on fire in anger at being forcibly evicted from the beach where they have camped for a week.

Police officer Balakrishnan said police moved on Marina beach in Chennai, the Tamil Nadu state capital, after thousands of people refused to leave the protest site Monday.

An executive order issued Saturday allowed the sport of jallikattu to resume but is only a temporary solution. The protesters want a court ban on the sport permanently lifted.

Jallikattu involves releasing a bull into a crowd of people who attempt to grab it and ride it. Opponents say it is cruel and unsafe to the animals.