Europe

Philippines, communist rebels resume peace talks in Rome

  • From left, Philippines Foreign Minster Perfecto Yasay, National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, leader Jose Maria Sison, and Philippines secretary Jesus G. Dureza (Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process) shake hands for the press prior to the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

    From left, Philippines Foreign Minster Perfecto Yasay, National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, leader Jose Maria Sison, and Philippines secretary Jesus G. Dureza (Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process) shake hands for the press prior to the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)  (The Associated Press)

  • From left, National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, Jose Maria Sison, Norwegian Special Envoy Elisabeth Slattum, secretary Jesus G. Dureza (Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process) and Philippines Foreign Minister Perfecto Yasay pose during the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

    From left, National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, Jose Maria Sison, Norwegian Special Envoy Elisabeth Slattum, secretary Jesus G. Dureza (Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process) and Philippines Foreign Minister Perfecto Yasay pose during the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)  (The Associated Press)

  • National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, leader Jose Maria Sison delivers his speech during the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

    National Democratic Front of the Philippines, NDFP, leader Jose Maria Sison delivers his speech during the formal opening of the Philippines peace talks in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. This is the third round of peace talks between the Philippine government and the communist National Democratic Front. During this latest round, the chairman of the government's peace panel, Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello is expected to sign the bilateral ceasefire agreement between the two parties. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)  (The Associated Press)

Philippine negotiators and communist guerrillas are set to resume peace talks in Rome, with the Maoist insurgents warning that alleged government violations of an accord on human rights may prompt them to end a monthslong ceasefire.

The presidential adviser to the talks, Jesus Dureza, said the government is optimistic "with managed expectations" about the resumption of the Norway-brokered negotiations beginning Thursday in the Italian capital.

Rebel chief negotiator Fidel Agcaoili was less optimistic, saying the guerrillas have raised a number of complaints, including alleged government breaches of a 1998 accord on respecting human rights and another pact on the safety of guerrilla consultants.

Agcaoili says the complaints, including the failure to release nearly 400 detainees the rebels consider political prisoners, made extending a five-month cease-fire "untenable."