Europe

Poll: Most Germans feel safe despite Berlin attack

  • This Dec. 21, 2016 image taken from CCTV provided by Belgian Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office on Friday Jan. 6, 2017, shows Anis Amri in Brussels North railway station. Investigators say the 24-year-old Tunisian drove a truck into the market on Dec. 19, killing 12 people. Belgian authorities said that he spent two hours at the Brussels North station coming from Amsterdam and then traveled to Italy via France, where he was killed Dec. 23 in a shootout with Italian police in a Milan suburb. (CCTV/Belgian Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office via AP)

    This Dec. 21, 2016 image taken from CCTV provided by Belgian Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office on Friday Jan. 6, 2017, shows Anis Amri in Brussels North railway station. Investigators say the 24-year-old Tunisian drove a truck into the market on Dec. 19, killing 12 people. Belgian authorities said that he spent two hours at the Brussels North station coming from Amsterdam and then traveled to Italy via France, where he was killed Dec. 23 in a shootout with Italian police in a Milan suburb. (CCTV/Belgian Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • A woman attends a minute of silence between flowers and candles in memory of the victims of  the Berlin terror attack in Berlin, Thursday Jan. 5, 2017.  A police official says that German authorities knew of 14 different identities used by Berlin Christmas market attacker Anis Amri. Investigators say the 24-year-old Tunisian drove a truck into the market on Dec. 19, killing 12 people. He was killed Dec. 23 in a shootout with Italian police in a Milan suburb. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)

    A woman attends a minute of silence between flowers and candles in memory of the victims of the Berlin terror attack in Berlin, Thursday Jan. 5, 2017. A police official says that German authorities knew of 14 different identities used by Berlin Christmas market attacker Anis Amri. Investigators say the 24-year-old Tunisian drove a truck into the market on Dec. 19, killing 12 people. He was killed Dec. 23 in a shootout with Italian police in a Milan suburb. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Most Germans believe the country is a safe place despite the recent truck attack in Berlin that claimed 12 lives shortly before Christmas.

A poll published late Thursday by public broadcaster ARD found that 73 percent of respondents said they felt secure in Germany, compared with 26 percent who didn't and one percent who declined to state an opinion.

The sentiment was true for supporters of all political parties except those backing the nationalist Alternative for Germany, where 66 percent said they feared for their safety.

AfD is expected to receive over 10 percent of the vote in this fall's general election.

Pollsters questioned 1,005 people by phone on Jan. 2-3, giving a margin of error of up to 3.1 percent.