Europe

Pope urges new culture of nonviolence for world politics

  • Pope Francis blesses faithful, during the Angelus prayer from his studio overlooking St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. (Giorgio OnoratiANSA via AP)

    Pope Francis blesses faithful, during the Angelus prayer from his studio overlooking St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. (Giorgio OnoratiANSA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Pope Francis celebrates a Mass to mark the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican, Monday, Dec. 12, 2016. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    Pope Francis celebrates a Mass to mark the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican, Monday, Dec. 12, 2016. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)  (The Associated Press)

Pope Francis is calling for a renewed culture of nonviolence to inform global politics today, saying military responses to conflicts only breed more violence.

Francis cited Mother Teresa, Mahatma Ghandi and Martin Luther King Jr. as models of nonviolent peacemakers in his message for the Catholic Church's World Day of Peace, which is celebrated Jan. 1.

In the message released Monday, Francis said: "Violence is not the cure for our broken world. Countering violence with violence leads at best to forced migrations and enormous suffering."

Earlier this year, the Vatican hosted a conference of peace activists who called on the Catholic Church to renounce its "just war" doctrine, which condones force to stop an unjust aggression under certain conditions. The activists urged a new peacemaking framework based on Gospel-mandated nonviolence.