US

UN further tightens North Korea sanctions

  • In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon speaks during a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters. The council voted Wednesday to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test yet. "The Security Council has today taken strong action on one of the most enduring and pressing peace and security challenges of our time: the nuclear and ballistic missile activities of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. I welcome the unanimous adoption of this new resolution," the Secretary General, who is South Korean, said, referring to North Korea by its full name. (Rick Bajornas/United Nations via AP)

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon speaks during a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters. The council voted Wednesday to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test yet. "The Security Council has today taken strong action on one of the most enduring and pressing peace and security challenges of our time: the nuclear and ballistic missile activities of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. I welcome the unanimous adoption of this new resolution," the Secretary General, who is South Korean, said, referring to North Korea by its full name. (Rick Bajornas/United Nations via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, the Security Council votes at U.N. headquarters to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test yet. The council unanimously approved the sanctions resolution following months of diplomatic wrangling over how best to respond to North Korea's latest nuclear test in September and their repeated defiance of international sanctions and diplomatic pressure. (Manuel Elias/United Nations via AP)

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, the Security Council votes at U.N. headquarters to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test yet. The council unanimously approved the sanctions resolution following months of diplomatic wrangling over how best to respond to North Korea's latest nuclear test in September and their repeated defiance of international sanctions and diplomatic pressure. (Manuel Elias/United Nations via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, Oh Joon, South Korea's ambassador to the United Nations, takes a seat at a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters. The council voted Wednesday to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test in September. (Rick Bajornas/United Nations via AP)

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 photo provided by the United Nations, Oh Joon, South Korea's ambassador to the United Nations, takes a seat at a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters. The council voted Wednesday to further tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test in September. (Rick Bajornas/United Nations via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The U.N. Security Council has voted to tighten sanctions on North Korea in response to their fifth and largest nuclear test.

The council unanimously approved the sanctions resolution on Wednesday with diplomats calling it a significant step forward.

The new sanctions target North Korea's hard currency revenues by placing a cap on coal exports, cutting them by at least 62 percent.

Diplomats said the new sanctions further clarify that the "livelihood" exemption, which allowed the Chinese imports, is meant only to protect the livelihoods of those currently living inside North Korea, not Chinese people or companies doing business with the country.

North Korea conducted its most recent atomic test in September, defying both tough international sanctions and long-standing diplomatic pressure to curb its nuclear ambitions.