ENVIRONMENT

UN report: Human footprint 'increasingly visible' in climate

  • FILE - In this file photo taken Sunday Jan. 29, 2016,  a malnourished  cow walks along a dried up river bed in the village of Chivi, Zimbabwe. Hot and wild and with an “increasingly visible human footprint” _ that’s how the U.N. weather agency summed up the global climate in the past five years. In a report released Tuesday Nov. 8, 2016 at international climate talks in Morocco, the World Meteorological Organization said 2011-2015 was the hottest five-year period on record.  (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

    FILE - In this file photo taken Sunday Jan. 29, 2016, a malnourished cow walks along a dried up river bed in the village of Chivi, Zimbabwe. Hot and wild and with an “increasingly visible human footprint” _ that’s how the U.N. weather agency summed up the global climate in the past five years. In a report released Tuesday Nov. 8, 2016 at international climate talks in Morocco, the World Meteorological Organization said 2011-2015 was the hottest five-year period on record. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - This is a Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. file photo of a girl as she walks through debris where homes once stood after Hurricane Matthew hit Jeremie, Haiti. Hot and wild and with an “increasingly visible human footprint” _ that’s how the U.N. weather agency summed up the global climate in the past five years. In a report released Tuesday Nov. 8, 2016 at international climate talks in Morocco, the World Meteorological Organization said 2011-2015 was the hottest five-year period on record. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery, File)

    FILE - This is a Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. file photo of a girl as she walks through debris where homes once stood after Hurricane Matthew hit Jeremie, Haiti. Hot and wild and with an “increasingly visible human footprint” _ that’s how the U.N. weather agency summed up the global climate in the past five years. In a report released Tuesday Nov. 8, 2016 at international climate talks in Morocco, the World Meteorological Organization said 2011-2015 was the hottest five-year period on record. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Participants and delegates attend the opening session of the Climate Conference in Marrakech, Morocco, Monday Nov. 7, 2016. Climate negotiators have started work on implementing the Paris pact on global warming amid uncertainty over how the U.S. election will impact the landmark deal as temperatures and greenhouse gases soar to new heights. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

    Participants and delegates attend the opening session of the Climate Conference in Marrakech, Morocco, Monday Nov. 7, 2016. Climate negotiators have started work on implementing the Paris pact on global warming amid uncertainty over how the U.S. election will impact the landmark deal as temperatures and greenhouse gases soar to new heights. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)  (The Associated Press)

Hot and wild and with an "increasingly visible human footprint" — that's how the U.N. weather agency sums up the global climate in the past five years.

In a report released Tuesday at international climate talks in Morocco, the World Meteorological Organization said 2011-2015 was the hottest five-year period on record.

That comes as no surprise as WMO's annual reports have showed record average temperatures in 2014 and 2015. But the agency said the five-year report provides a better overview of warming trends and extreme events such as prolonged droughts and recurrent heatwaves.

The WMO's preliminary climate assessment for 2016, which could be hotter still, is set to be released next week.