Africa

Kenyan police fire tear gas on anti-corruption protesters

  • Demonstrators carry a mock hospital bed covered in fake blood to illustrate the slogan that Kenyans are bleeding due to poor hospital services caused by corruption, in Nairobi, Kenya Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016. Police in Kenya's capital fired tear gas on protesters demanding that the president act on rampant corruption or resign, following allegations which the government denies that around $50 million has been diverted from the health ministry. (AP Photo)

    Demonstrators carry a mock hospital bed covered in fake blood to illustrate the slogan that Kenyans are bleeding due to poor hospital services caused by corruption, in Nairobi, Kenya Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016. Police in Kenya's capital fired tear gas on protesters demanding that the president act on rampant corruption or resign, following allegations which the government denies that around $50 million has been diverted from the health ministry. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Demonstrators wear mock prison outfits to show that they want to imprison those engaged in corruption, in Nairobi, Kenya Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016. Police in Kenya's capital fired tear gas on protesters demanding that the president act on rampant corruption or resign, following allegations which the government denies that around $50 million has been diverted from the health ministry. (AP Photo)

    Demonstrators wear mock prison outfits to show that they want to imprison those engaged in corruption, in Nairobi, Kenya Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016. Police in Kenya's capital fired tear gas on protesters demanding that the president act on rampant corruption or resign, following allegations which the government denies that around $50 million has been diverted from the health ministry. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

A Kenyan official says police fired tear gas on anti-corruption protesters demanding the president to act on corrupt or resign.

Central Nairobi's police chief Paul Wanjama said police dispersed the group to avoid a possible clash with a separate group that supports the president. Wanjama could not explain why other group was not tear-gassed. There were no arrests, Wanjama said.

The protests were sparked off by allegations that around $50 million has been diverted from the health ministry.

Such scandals are putting public pressure on President Uhuru Kenyatta, who is seeking re-election next year with the pledge to eradicate corruption.

Kenya is among the most corrupt countries in the world and was ranked 139 out of 168 countries in a 2015 index by Transparency International..