Asia

In wake of Thai king's death, grief is black and white

  • A mourner pours holy water into a bowl as part of a bathing ceremony for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Thailand began its first day in 70 years without a king on Friday in a profound state of mourning, with people across the shaken nation dressed in black following the death of the world's longest-reigning monarch. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    A mourner pours holy water into a bowl as part of a bathing ceremony for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Thailand began its first day in 70 years without a king on Friday in a profound state of mourning, with people across the shaken nation dressed in black following the death of the world's longest-reigning monarch. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)  (The Associated Press)

  • Thai people stand in lines to offer condolences for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Grieving Thais went to work dressed mostly in black Friday morning, just hours after the palace announced the death of their beloved King Bhumibol, the politically fractious country's unifying figure and the world's longest-reigning monarch.(AP Photo/ Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Thai people stand in lines to offer condolences for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Grieving Thais went to work dressed mostly in black Friday morning, just hours after the palace announced the death of their beloved King Bhumibol, the politically fractious country's unifying figure and the world's longest-reigning monarch.(AP Photo/ Gemunu Amarasinghe)  (The Associated Press)

In the wake of King Bhumibol Adulyadej's death, Thais are expressing their grief in black and white.

Ever since the palace announced the news on Thursday, television stations across Thailand have been broadcasting pool footage of the king's life in monochrome.

News websites, newspapers and even Google Thailand have joined in, veiling their front pages in muted colors.

Thais on Facebook have also signaled their grief by changing their profile photos to black, the dominant color of clothing worn by many people in the capital on Friday.

Bhumibol died at the age of 88, and was widely revered. His reign lasted 70 years, so most Thais have known no other king in their lifetime.