Europe

Failure to get Syria cease-fire stole spotlight at UN

  • File-This Sept. 21, 2016, file photo shows Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, meeting United Nations General Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, at U.N. headquarters. The failed attempt by the U.S. and Russia to revive a cease-fire in Syria stole the spotlight at the annual U.N. gathering of world leaders but every other global hotspot had its moment _ and there were some chuckles as well including a message to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to be ready to receive his gift from South Sudan of a "white bull."(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    File-This Sept. 21, 2016, file photo shows Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, meeting United Nations General Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, at U.N. headquarters. The failed attempt by the U.S. and Russia to revive a cease-fire in Syria stole the spotlight at the annual U.N. gathering of world leaders but every other global hotspot had its moment _ and there were some chuckles as well including a message to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to be ready to receive his gift from South Sudan of a "white bull."(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • File-This Sept. 20, 2016, file photo shows British Prime Minister Theresa May, right, speaking at a Leader's Refugee Summit as U.S. President Barack Obama left, and Vice President Joe Biden, center, listen during the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters. As for the "buzz" in U.N. corridors, it was two newcomers making their debuts on the international stage that captured the most attention: British Prime Minister Theresa May and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. May assured the General Assembly that Britain will remain a global power and continue playing a role in trying to resolve the many challenges in the world despite its decision to leave the European Union. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

    File-This Sept. 20, 2016, file photo shows British Prime Minister Theresa May, right, speaking at a Leader's Refugee Summit as U.S. President Barack Obama left, and Vice President Joe Biden, center, listen during the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters. As for the "buzz" in U.N. corridors, it was two newcomers making their debuts on the international stage that captured the most attention: British Prime Minister Theresa May and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. May assured the General Assembly that Britain will remain a global power and continue playing a role in trying to resolve the many challenges in the world despite its decision to leave the European Union. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • File-This Sept. 20, 2016, file photo shows Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaking during the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. As for the "buzz" in U.N. corridors, it was two newcomers making their debuts on the international stage that captured the most attention: British Prime Minister Theresa May and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trudeau announced new plans for Canada to become more globally engaged, including providing 750 U.N. peacekeepers, and tried to calm security jitters after a weekend bombing in New York City on the eve of the global gathering. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    File-This Sept. 20, 2016, file photo shows Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaking during the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. As for the "buzz" in U.N. corridors, it was two newcomers making their debuts on the international stage that captured the most attention: British Prime Minister Theresa May and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trudeau announced new plans for Canada to become more globally engaged, including providing 750 U.N. peacekeepers, and tried to calm security jitters after a weekend bombing in New York City on the eve of the global gathering. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)  (The Associated Press)

The failed attempt by the U.S. and Russia to revive a cease-fire in Syria stole the spotlight at the annual U.N. gathering of world leaders but every other global hotspot had its moment.

And there were some chuckles as well including a message to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to be ready to receive his gift of a "white bull" from South Sudan.

With the final speeches of the six-day gabfest delivered on Monday, there were also a few highpoints.

Last December's Paris climate agreement got 31 more ratifications at a high-level event hosted by Ban, topping the 55 countries required and just over 7 percent short of the 55 percent of global emissions needed for the deal to enter into force. That magic number will hopefully be reached in November.