The Americas

Families of missing 43 students lead march in Mexico

  • Parents of the 43 missing students march holding images of their sons during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held  on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. The government's initial investigation decided the students were killed and incinerated in a fire. But international experts have cast doubt on this theory and the families have not accepted it. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    Parents of the 43 missing students march holding images of their sons during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. The government's initial investigation decided the students were killed and incinerated in a fire. But international experts have cast doubt on this theory and the families have not accepted it. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man carries portraits of two of the 43 missing students along with a sign that reads in Spanish "Pena Out," referring to Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held  on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. The government's initial investigation decided the students were killed and incinerated in a fire. But international experts have cast doubt on this theory and the families have not accepted it. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    A man carries portraits of two of the 43 missing students along with a sign that reads in Spanish "Pena Out," referring to Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. The government's initial investigation decided the students were killed and incinerated in a fire. But international experts have cast doubt on this theory and the families have not accepted it. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man wears a T-shirt with a hashtag saying "We are missing 43" and a pin with the image of one of the 43 missing students during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held  on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    A man wears a T-shirt with a hashtag saying "We are missing 43" and a pin with the image of one of the 43 missing students during a protest march in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. The march was held on the second anniversary of the disappearance, on Sept. 26, 2014, of the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)  (The Associated Press)

The families of 43 missing Mexican college students are leading a march of unions, students and other supporters through Mexico City to demand the young men be found on the second anniversary of their disappearance.

On Sept. 26, 2014, the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa were in the southern city of Iguala hijacking buses. Local police intercepted them and turned them over to a local drug cartel.

The government's initial investigation decided the students were killed and incinerated in a fire. But international experts have cast doubt on this theory and the families have not accepted it.

Clemente Rodriguez's son Christian is among the missing and he believes that his son and the others are still alive and that the families will never believe the government.