US

India trying diplomacy in dealing with rival Pakistan

  • FILE – In this May 27, 2014 file photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, walks to shake hand with his Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif before the start of their meeting in New Delhi, India. Even with his own officials saying the Sept. 18, 2016 attack on an Indian military base was launched by Pakistan-based militants, Modi is relying on diplomacy more than saber-rattling. In large part, this is because Modi and Indian forces already must defuse the massive and relentless anti-India protests that have swept its portion of Kashmir, triggered by the killing of a young rebel leader in July. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." (AP Photo /Manish Swarup, File)

    FILE – In this May 27, 2014 file photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, walks to shake hand with his Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif before the start of their meeting in New Delhi, India. Even with his own officials saying the Sept. 18, 2016 attack on an Indian military base was launched by Pakistan-based militants, Modi is relying on diplomacy more than saber-rattling. In large part, this is because Modi and Indian forces already must defuse the massive and relentless anti-India protests that have swept its portion of Kashmir, triggered by the killing of a young rebel leader in July. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." (AP Photo /Manish Swarup, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • File – In this Sept. 18, 2016 file photo, an Indian army helicopter flies over the army base which was attacked by suspected rebels in the town of Uri, west of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Even with his own officials saying the attack was launched by Pakistan-based militants, Modi is relying on diplomacy more than saber-rattling. In large part, this is because Modi and Indian forces already must defuse the massive and relentless anti-India protests that have swept its portion of Kashmir, triggered by the killing of a young rebel leader more than two months ago. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan, File)

    File – In this Sept. 18, 2016 file photo, an Indian army helicopter flies over the army base which was attacked by suspected rebels in the town of Uri, west of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Even with his own officials saying the attack was launched by Pakistan-based militants, Modi is relying on diplomacy more than saber-rattling. In large part, this is because Modi and Indian forces already must defuse the massive and relentless anti-India protests that have swept its portion of Kashmir, triggered by the killing of a young rebel leader more than two months ago. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • File- In this July 19, 2009 file photo, an Indian Border Security Force soldier, right, and a Pakistani Rangers soldier face one another at a daily closing ceremony at the Wagah border post near Lahore, Pakistan. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, 2016, Pakistan's prime minister Nawaz Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." Diplomatic broadsides followed, with an Indian diplomat calling Pakistan a "terrorist state" and Pakistan's foreign ministry offering support to Kashmiris' "movement for freedom from Indian oppression." The South Asian nations' dispute over Kashmir is a perennial topic at the annual gathering of world leaders, but most countries now favor settling the dispute by India and Pakistan through direct talks. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File)

    File- In this July 19, 2009 file photo, an Indian Border Security Force soldier, right, and a Pakistani Rangers soldier face one another at a daily closing ceremony at the Wagah border post near Lahore, Pakistan. In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, 2016, Pakistan's prime minister Nawaz Sharif strongly criticized India's suppression of protests in Kashmir, calling for an independent inquiry into killings there and a U.N. fact-finding mission to investigate what he called India's "brutalities." Diplomatic broadsides followed, with an Indian diplomat calling Pakistan a "terrorist state" and Pakistan's foreign ministry offering support to Kashmiris' "movement for freedom from Indian oppression." The South Asian nations' dispute over Kashmir is a perennial topic at the annual gathering of world leaders, but most countries now favor settling the dispute by India and Pakistan through direct talks. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File)  (The Associated Press)

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi has long been known for his hard-line stance on Pakistan. It was a major part of the campaign that swept him to power.

But even with his own officials saying a recent attack on an Indian military base was launched by Pakistan-based militants, Modi is relying more on diplomacy than saber-rattling.

In large part, this is because Modi and Indian forces are far too occupied trying to defuse the massive and relentless anti-India protests that have swept its portion of Kashmir, triggered by the killing of a young rebel leader more than two months ago. The unrest has led to a clampdown by security forces that often left the Kashmir Valley under curfew, with schools, universities and businesses shut through the summer tourist season.