Europe

Duterte to invite UN chief, EU to probe Philippine killings

  • Opposition Senator Leila De Lima gestures during a news conference she called at the Philippine Senate, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. De Lima, who led an investigation into President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody anti-drug campaign, was ousted Monday from the justice committee in a vote that human rights advocates said could derail accountability in the crackdown. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Opposition Senator Leila De Lima gestures during a news conference she called at the Philippine Senate, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. De Lima, who led an investigation into President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody anti-drug campaign, was ousted Monday from the justice committee in a vote that human rights advocates said could derail accountability in the crackdown. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Opposition Senator Leila De Lima gestures during a news conference she called at the Philippine Senate, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. De Lima, who led an investigation into President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody anti-drug campaign, was ousted Monday from the justice committee in a vote that human rights advocates said could derail accountability in the crackdown. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Opposition Senator Leila De Lima gestures during a news conference she called at the Philippine Senate, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. De Lima, who led an investigation into President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody anti-drug campaign, was ousted Monday from the justice committee in a vote that human rights advocates said could derail accountability in the crackdown. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Witness Edgar Matobato, who claimed to be a member of the death squad of the then Davao city Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, gestures as he testifies before the Senate's Justice and Human Rights Committee on the killings in President Rodrigo Duterte's so-called "War on Drugs" Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. The senate hearing resumed Thursday with the new chairman Sen. Richard Gordon presiding the hearing following the ouster of its Chair Senator Leila De Lima last Monday. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Witness Edgar Matobato, who claimed to be a member of the death squad of the then Davao city Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, gestures as he testifies before the Senate's Justice and Human Rights Committee on the killings in President Rodrigo Duterte's so-called "War on Drugs" Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. The senate hearing resumed Thursday with the new chairman Sen. Richard Gordon presiding the hearing following the ouster of its Chair Senator Leila De Lima last Monday. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

The Philippine president says he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless.

President Rodrigo Duterte disclosed the offer in a speech Thursday in which he again lashed out at critics of his deadly crackdown, including President Barack Obama and European countries. He accused them of hypocrisy for raising concerns about his anti-crime campaign while launching military strikes that killed innocent people in the Middle East.

More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since June and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in the crackdown. Despite growing alarm, Duterte says he won't stop the campaign.