Europe

Observers: Jordan vote held in 'largely peaceful' atmosphere

  • Jordanians vote in elections in Amman, Jordan, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Jordanians are voting for a new parliament under revised rules meant to strengthen political parties -- an election seen as a small step toward democratic reform. More than 4 million residents of the pro-Western monarchy are eligible to vote for a 130-member parliament, with 27 seats reserved for women, Christians and ethnic minorities. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordanians vote in elections in Amman, Jordan, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016.¬†Jordanians are voting for a new parliament under revised rules meant to strengthen political parties -- an election seen as a small step toward democratic reform. More than 4 million residents of the pro-Western monarchy are eligible to vote for a 130-member parliament, with 27 seats reserved for women, Christians and ethnic minorities.¬†(AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

  • Jordanians vote in elections, Amman, Jordan, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Jordanians are voting for a new parliament under revised rules meant to strengthen political parties -- an election seen as a small step toward democratic reform. More than 4 million residents of the pro-Western monarchy are eligible to vote for a 130-member parliament, with 27 seats reserved for women, Christians and ethnic minorities. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordanians vote in elections, Amman, Jordan, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Jordanians are voting for a new parliament under revised rules meant to strengthen political parties -- an election seen as a small step toward democratic reform. More than 4 million residents of the pro-Western monarchy are eligible to vote for a 130-member parliament, with 27 seats reserved for women, Christians and ethnic minorities. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

International observers say most voters in Jordan's parliament election were able to cast their ballots "without any significant impediment."

The 45-member team from 16 countries presented its findings Wednesday, a day after 1.5 million Jordanians, or 37 percent of eligible voters, elected a 130-member parliament.

The team says the election was held in a "largely peaceful atmosphere."

Results were slowly trickling in Wednesday, with the election commission announcing the names of winners in three of 23 electoral districts.

Most closely watched is the showing of the opposition Muslim Brotherhood, whose political arm, the Islamic Action Front, competed for the first time since 2007.

Senior IAF official Zaki Bani Ersheid told The Associated Press he expected an IAF-led alliance to win about 16 seats, based on unofficial reports from voting districts.