Pacific

Relatives of MH370 victims want more possible debris studied

  • American wreckage hunter Blaine Gibson talks to the media  Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after handing over to Australian searchers five pieces of debris that he suspects could be from the missing Malaysian airliner. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)

    American wreckage hunter Blaine Gibson talks to the media Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after handing over to Australian searchers five pieces of debris that he suspects could be from the missing Malaysian airliner. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)  (The Associated Press)

  • Jennifer Chong, a Malaysian-Australian dual citizen who lost her husband in the missing Malaysian airliner, addresses the media on Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after meeting Australian officials coordinating the search for the plane. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)

    Jennifer Chong, a Malaysian-Australian dual citizen who lost her husband in the missing Malaysian airliner, addresses the media on Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after meeting Australian officials coordinating the search for the plane. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)  (The Associated Press)

  • Grace Nathan, left, of Malaysia and Jiang Hui Be of China address the media on Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after meeting Australian officials coordinating the search for the missing Malaysian airliner. Both lost their mothers in the tragedy. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)

    Grace Nathan, left, of Malaysia and Jiang Hui Be of China address the media on Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, in Canberra, Australia, after meeting Australian officials coordinating the search for the missing Malaysian airliner. Both lost their mothers in the tragedy. Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 called Monday for more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)  (The Associated Press)

Relatives of some of the 239 passengers and crew on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 want more of its possible debris to be examined to define a new search area for the missing plane.

The current search area in the southern Indian Ocean will be the last area thoroughly examined with deep-sea sonar equipment in the absence of credible new evidence that identified the plane's location.

Eight relatives of lost passengers who met with Australian officials coordinating the search on behalf of Malaysia on Monday expressed frustration that what constituted credible new evidence has not been explained.

Some confirmed pieces of debris have washed ashore in the western Indian Ocean, and the families believe other items yet to be examined may be clues to the plane's location.