RELIGION

AP PHOTOS: Muslims mark start of Eid al-Adha holiday

  • Egyptians take part in Eid Al-Adha prayers at the al-Seddik Mosque in Cairo, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Roger Anis)

    Egyptians take part in Eid Al-Adha prayers at the al-Seddik Mosque in Cairo, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Roger Anis)  (The Associated Press)

  • Egyptians try to catch balloons distributed for free after Eid Al-Adha prayers outside al-Seddik mosque in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Roger Anis)

    Egyptians try to catch balloons distributed for free after Eid Al-Adha prayers outside al-Seddik mosque in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Roger Anis)  (The Associated Press)

  • Kosovars line up outside Sultan Mehmet Fatih mosque to offer Eid al-Adha prayers in capital Pristina, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha in local language, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son on God's command. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)

    Kosovars line up outside Sultan Mehmet Fatih mosque to offer Eid al-Adha prayers in capital Pristina, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha in local language, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son on God's command. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)  (The Associated Press)

Muslims worldwide are celebrating the first day of Eid al-Adha, or "Feast of Sacrifice," the most important Islamic holiday that commemorates the willingness of the Prophet Ibrahim — also known as Abraham to Christians and Jews — to sacrifice his son before God stayed his hand.

During the three-day holiday, Muslims slaughter livestock, distributing part of the meat to the poor. The holiday begins on the 10th day of the Islamic lunar month of Dhul-Hijja, during the annual hajj pilgrimage.

In Saudi Arabia, close to 2 million pilgrims performed on Monday one of the final rites of the hajj by symbolically stoning the devil.

Here is a series of images by Associated Press photojournalists of the celebrations of Eid al-Adha.

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