Europe

May says Britain still inspires confidence post-Brexit

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at a press conference held at the end of the G-20 summit in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at a press conference held at the end of the G-20 summit in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May, right, meets Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 economic summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (Aly Song/Pool Photo via AP)

    British Prime Minister Theresa May, right, meets Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 economic summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (Aly Song/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at a press conference held at the end of the G-20 summit in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at a press conference held at the end of the G-20 summit in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

After meeting with other world leaders during the G-20 summit, British Prime Minister Theresa May says her country still inspires economic confidence despite its decision to leave the European Union.

She said the Australian trade minister would visit Britain this week for exploratory talks on a trade deal.

She also told reporters Monday that India, Mexico, South Korea and Singapore had said they would welcome talks on removing trade barriers.

But Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told May that he wanted her to provide more "predictability" about her plans for a post-Brexit Britain, after his government said it was concerned about the future profitability of Japanese companies.

May said Japanese technology company SoftBank's $32 billion offer to buy Britain's ARM Holdings was a massive vote of confidence in Britain.